Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm a high school student and I've been playing the tenor saxophone for four years now.
I had a David Hite mouthpiece, but it cracked during marching season so I'm looking for a new one. I want a versatile, good all-round mouthpiece that will accommodate the music in concert band and jazz band (marching band I don't really care). I'm looking for good dynamic control, good tone, etc.
I've never heard a Meyer before, but my band teacher they're really easy to blow (no dirty minds please), and I'd probably want a 5M or 6M if I get one.
My private teacher suggested to get a Brilhart Ebolin hard rubber, saying it has great tone, and is quite versatile.
So here are my questions:
1. Which do you prefer?
2. Could ya'll detail each brand?
3. Are all Brilhart Ebolins hard rubber? Woodwinds and Brasswinds doesn't specify.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
I played the Brilhart in high school and it was an excellent mouthpiece. I have owned a vintage HR Meyer Bros. NY and it played quite well - the tip just wasn't open enough for me so I sold it. As far as modern Meyers go, I think that they are fine for tenor, but I would opt for the Brilhart, personally. Your teacher is spot on. A metal lig might give you a bit more brightness in the sound if you want it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So what model of Brilhart would you recommend? There's like 3* 4* 5* and stuff. Would the one closest to a .80 facing have a good balance of a sound (between bright or warm)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
I think that a facing close to .080 is good. I'm not sure that a wider tip would be much brighter and they're harder to control.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
21,075 Posts
First off, the Brilhart Ebolin is plastic and the Hard Rubber ones will cost you a lot, like $400+. The Ebolins are nice and can be found in the $35 range for the older ones. A 4*-5* would be good. I have a Meyer 6M and it is a very good all around mouthpiece. I also use a Morgan Excalibur 6E and have a set of Ricos, B5, C5 and M5. The Ricos are very inexpensive but may not be the best choice for concert band. I have all of these for sale or can direct you to the places that have new ones for trial.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2007
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
Brilhart Ebolin is made of plastic. They are black with a white bite plate. Lester Young and Gene Ammons played Ebolin. Maceo Parker plays Ebolin on his alto. Brilhart Tonalin are white with black bite plate. They are also made of plastic. Stan Getz, Charlie Parker and Johnny Hodges played Tonalins. Brilhart Hard Rubber are not made anymore as far as I know. They were made of Hard Rubber and marked "Hard Rubber" on the shaft. They had no bite plate. These are very expensive mouthpieces. Zoot Sims played one. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
OK, sorry to keep bugging you guys, but I found one on sale at the local Buddy Rogers but it's a 3*, and according to the facing chart I found, it's around 70 (I'm guessing this is like .70).
I don't want to sound too classical, but I'm not an expert on facings. Should I go for it?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2007
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
OK, sorry to keep bugging you guys, but I found one on sale at the local Buddy Rogers but it's a 3*, and according to the facing chart I found, it's around 70 (I'm guessing this is like .70).
I don't want to sound too classical, but I'm not an expert on facings. Should I go for it?
A Brilhart Ebolin 3* can be .085. Further, the * means short facing, so it will feel more open. With the right strength reed you are not going to sound classic. Naturally, it is best if you can try it at the shop. But it should be OK for you.
Hope you'll be back and tell us what it ended with.
Facing charts are not much reliable with Brilhart, because their tip openings are very inaccurate. But luckily, the vast majority play well. I have tried quite many and never came across one that did not play well. They sound different, but they all play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thank you guys! Your input is all appreciated.
Once the snowstorm clears up, I'll try some Brilhart Ebolin models at the store and see what I end up liking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Hi there llamasandpenguines...I'm at the opposite end of the scale from you, but I've been playing tenor sax (again) for about the same period as you, around 4 years, after a 30 year layoff so you'll guess that I'm heading rapidly for my 3 score +10!!! I play in a concert band and also run a sax quartet doing local gigs, weddings and Christenings and stuff like that. I also march with the band from time to time, though I hate marching to be honest.

All I can an say is that after 4 years I'm still searching for the 'right' mouthpiece and reed combination - it 'aint easy. at the moment I have used /accumulated the following in my search:

Meyer 5M
Selmer S80 C*
Selmer Soloist D
Otto Link 'Vintage' Tone Edge 6
Otto Link Tone Edge 5*
Otto Link Super Tone Master 5*
and I very recently acquired a Brilhart Personaline L5

Reeds - you name them !! Rico, Vandoren blue box, V16s, V12s, ZZs, La Voz, synthetics, all in strengths from 2 to 3½, I even tried a V16 4 for a while. But I think I've settled on the 'right' reed now which is the Gonzales 2¾. These are great reeds, for me anyway, very consistent out of the box and they play very true.

OK the verdict well, in a nutshell, for the quartet there's no contest it's the Selmer Soloist. Beautiful blender with the other 3 saxes yet if there's a tenor solo spot in a quartet number the Soloist just effortlessly projects above the others.

For the concert band - much more difficult to decide. The Meyer is a very nice mouthpiece for the concert band but it's very bland in character and I have difficulty trying to get any 'personality' out of it if that makes sense. I was using the S80 for concert band until I got the Brilhart. OK the S80 has a reputation for being ...'your first upgradde from a student piece'...but don't let that fool you, it's a very good mouthpiece which can be soft and mellow yet really punchy if you poke it enough. But then I got the Brilhart and I have to say it's really threatening to take over from the S80 for concert band work. It's quite a bit brighter than the S80, but very controllable. If you just reduce the air column in the Brilhart it can purr nicely, yet thump it with lots of it and it can be a screamer. Unlike the Meyer and the S80, I think the Brilhart demands more of you, the player, but the rewards are exciting.

So in answer to your question I think the decision is if you want a good, safe, steady mouthpiece which is a bit bland but very consistent - the Meyer. If want a bit of fun and excitement - try a Brilhart.

Oh, and for the marching band, like you, anything with a bit of bamboo strapped to it.

Good luck in your search..............
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top