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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody,
About three months back I travelled to New York to buy a Braithophone from the legendary George Braith.
It is a fantastic instrument!

Here's a short clip of a tune I did on the horn a few days ago. Note that I onlye had it for a couple of months, so I'm far from a master of the braithophone... :)


All the best,
Jonas Kullhammar
 

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Nice invention.

Paul Stocker has beenplaying soprano and alto together ( and separately :twisted: ) for years with two saxophones modified by Nico Bodewes to extend their rage. But this rather weird instrument might be of interest to him. I've alerted him about it.



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! Didn't mean to scare you. I just needed protection so that my head wouldn't explode :)
 

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The mask makes it, Kullis.
 

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I see it is a 鈥 mere鈥 $7000.

I love this quote, from the site, :

鈥...For bulk purchasing....鈥 (!!!!)

Can you imagine this being sold in large numbers? I can鈥檛. Or a marching band of Braithophones!

Anyway there will be many sold to several collectors around the world, we shall see how many will find their way on the stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
...we shall see how many will find their way on the stage.
Mine has already had it's stage premiere, and more gigs coming up. As far as I know I am the first customer of the Braithophone company, and several of my scandinavian collegues are already showing interest.
I also doubt that it will sell in very large numbers, but who knows. In my opinion it is very unique, and not impossible to play. I think many saxophone players could have use for an instrument like this.
 

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My friend Paul Stocker has answered that........it's not for him. He will keep on playing his horns his own way. The keys, made by Nico Bodewes, have been lacquered by Selmer in Paris
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I understand mr Stocker. It would be like starting over since the braithophone also has the saxophones on switched sides to what he is used to.
 

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Presidents Day, saw George Braith and the Braithophone- what a surprise. What initially sounded to me like a series of
car horns hammering out a tune in a New York Mid town traffic jam turned out to be a fun, beautifully performed jazz concert by Mr. Braith and friends.
It was an unusually lyrical and fun show. How he can maintain two mouthpieces and transcribe one hand on alto and the other on Soprano and create
such music is amazing to hear. You should go too, and participate in the joy Mr. Braith has in performing.

After meeting Jamaican composer Etienne Charles at UC Berkley Ca. earlier in the month
and hearing his new album Carnival, The Sound of the People ,I was taken on a journey to whats current from the African roots of jazz
performed by the street crews during Carnival in Africa. That taught me a lot about the music that emerged from New Orleans as a result of the slave trade.
The roaming crews music was fun and what rhythm. I wanted to go to Mardi Gras now!
My New York experience with jazz needed some intellectual levity after that journey, and I found it at the Fat Cat club in NYC with
George Braith on the Braithophone concert, Lou Rainone piano, Ben Meignels bass,Tare Alexander drums.
He did one set on a Mark VI and two with the Braithophone. I enjoyed all and recommend anyone interested in saxophone and something different to keep this musician on their radar.
 

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The Braithophone is probably a much better idea than the aulochrome ( which is two sopranos together ) because it has at the very least the theoretical possibility of producing the Tartini effect (when playing two sound a just fifth apart) one could produce a third sound which is there as a combination of the two.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combination_tone

Wether it is audible is a different matter.

 

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incredible ingenuity and so unusual I think Adolph would approve
 

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Milandro, whats your take on the actual sound. I was kind of turned off by the sound at first, but the music Braith makes with it is enjoyable.
I couldn't help getting it all mixed up with traffic horns and Mardi Gras- but it was fun music, and an escape really into a new aspect of jazz I
needed to make.
 

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well i find it " interesting" but it would be a lot more interesting if the instrument were played with a technique that makes independent sounds possible.

Also my friend Paul Stocker plays a a soprano and alto together but often only one of the two.


Ideally you could add another instrument as a bourdon and play like the Launeddas ( see the independent fingering)

 

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Nicola Agus- wow thanks for sharing that clip; so each tube has its own reed, and fingerings but are played at the same time? I see two are tied together.
Looks like Braith uses Alto and Tenor mouthpiece instead of a Alto and Soprano mouthpiece, whats that do??

Couldn't he play one mouthpiece at a time, back and forth or would he loose compression the way he has the two horns melded together?
 

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well, of course the launeddas are not the same thing as a saxophone, it doesn't really have a mouthpiece and the reeds are directly played into the mouth cavity.

The player has three pipes, one is just a bourdon and plays a fixed note. The other two pipes are played somewhat independently one from the other and play melodies in thirds and sixths.

I think that only two ( bourdon and bass melody) are tied together one is independent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Launeddas

the instrument is played mostly by traditional players and played as pipes are.

The adjoining of two instrument with independent mouthpieces but connected makes it impossible to go from one instrument to another that is why the way to play soprano and alto used by Paul Stocker (and few others) is preferable because otherwise the limitations of the instrument quickly become a burden.

This is a great piece that I've shared many times before

 
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