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Discussion Starter #1
Over the past few years I've been using a spray called "Tone Woodwind-All Pad & Bore Formula" manufactured by Chem-Pak, Inc, that has SEEMED to help out with preventing condensation from building up / leaking out every key at the top of the horn and preventing water bubbles from filling the neck octave key hole. I say "seemed" because maybe it's all voodoo/placebo effect, but in any case I've been using it. Problem is, my little spray can finally ran out, and of course (as with every product I've ever bought and found necessary), Chem-Pak has discontinued making it.

Does anyone know of any other products out there that do the same thing? There are no ingredients listed on the can so it's hard to tell if maybe it's something super generic I could find at a hardware store or something like that. Or alternatively, what are some people's favorite solutions to the age-old drip problem? I know one sax player who will remain nameless who literally GLUED a small piece of sponge under one of his toneholes to catch moisture, but I'm not willing to go that far.

Ok go!
 

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Over the past few years I've been using a spray called "Tone Woodwind-All Pad & Bore Formula" manufactured by Chem-Pak, Inc, that has SEEMED to help out with preventing condensation from building up / leaking out every key at the top of the horn and preventing water bubbles from filling the neck octave key hole. I say "seemed" because maybe it's all voodoo/placebo effect, but in any case I've been using it. Problem is, my little spray can finally ran out, and of course (as with every product I've ever bought and found necessary), Chem-Pak has discontinued making it.
How did you apply it? Were you spraying it on the pads?? Shooting it down the bore???

Curious,

George
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How did you apply it? Were you spraying it on the pads?? Shooting it down the bore???

Curious,

George
I would spray some through the neck, and some straight down the bore. The idea being that it would help the condensation drip all the way down to the crook of the horn to be easily poured out. Picked up on this technique from a classical oboeist friend.
 

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Ah, OK.

FWIW, I used to do a similar thing by spraying Lemon Pledge on a “Shove It” swab, , removing excess with a paper towel, then running it into the bore - smells great, too!
 

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any fluid apt to reduce superficial tension of the condensation would work but the thing that, for me, works the absolute best is simply holding the saxophone straight in front of you.

In this way condensation never finds his way out the top keys. If you play with the horn on the side it is guaranteed that you horn will drip condensation. There are many ways to skin many cats.
 

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Recently I started playing more sitting down as apposed to standing and was amazed at the amount of water coming out of the horn. I felt like I could pour an ounce of water out every 30 minutes if I tipped the horn upside down. Never had anything like that standing up.
 

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if the way you are built would allow you the playing “ in front of you” position while sitting down, you would revert to no condensation leaking on your fingers,.
 

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It’s an annoying problem to have, I admit (ie the leaking of condensation on one’s fingers). However, to me it would seem like coating the bore of your instrument with such a substance could cause eventual problems.

As to answer your question it seems like the stuff you’ve been using is just a hydrophobic spray (eg Scotchguard)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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but the more important question is

Is owning an Iphone (with tapatalk) going to do anything about preventing your fingers to be wet?
 

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but the more important question is

Is owning an Iphone (with tapatalk) going to do anything about preventing your fingers to be wet?
Absolutely - Those little toys are so addictive most of us no longer have time to practice. That and an iPad have almost completely eliminated my condensation problems... :)
 

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Thanks for this insight :bluewink::mrgreen:, being a Samsung owner I am not privy to these deambulating orphic mysteries , yet as a long time apple computer user I would have expected to have collected at least some of this metaphysic knowledge. :(
 

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Thanks for this insight :bluewink::mrgreen:, being a Samsung owner I am not privy to these deambulating orphic mysteries , yet as a long time apple computer user I would have expected to have collected at least some of this metaphysic knowledge. :(
Understood. Neither of our MACS display any moisture reducing capabilities either. Probably because internet surfing is not allowed on them. They are strictly studio machines....
 

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:)...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
As for horn positioning, I'm not sold on that. Sometimes when I play standing up with the horn straight up and down in front of me, it still happens. Sometimes sitting down it doesn't. Sometimes it goes away and starts dripping all the way to the bottom as I keep playing (maybe the horn warms up farther down the bore?) but sometimes that doesn't hold true. Can't find a rhyme or reason to it.
And as for the contents, it may be something like that, but I'm thinking maybe it's just some kind of a more extremely light oil of some sort....quotes from the bottle for clues:
"For the care of ALL woodwinds. Keeps pads soft, prevents air leaks and sticking pads. Guards against cracking of wooden instruments. Dispenses condensation for minimum pad wetting. Regular use will improve tone and timbre" [good one] "and substantially increase pad life. Directions: Remove mouthpiece. Spray a short burst in both ends of instrument (spray saxophone neck). Spray pads, mechanism and outside of horn. Wipe off excess."

Granted, I never went all out like that spraying it all the way up and down my entire body lying naked in a bathtub and whatnot like they suggest, but makes me think (hope?) maybe it's not harmful to the horn with those kinds of recommendations?
 

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much depends on the way you are built, you may be very tall or very small and still hold it in a way that causes the condensation to find its way from the top keys.

Maybe you play a very ancient or ultra modern horn with a completely different key position or maybe it leaks fro a key that I don’t have ( high F# ?).

Fact is that I have been talking about this for years and most of the time people found this a solution but as for everything pertaining humans mileage varies.


Condensation is overrated. It is all hot air :twisted:
 

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Just a small, general, point. Water vapour actually needs a nucleus to condense out on - dust, a rough surface, grit, etc - and won't readily condense on a clean, dry, smooth surface, even if it's cold enough.
Could be if someone has a particular problem with dust or soot in the environment getting in the horn? Maybe a swab that sheds (as in "leaves behind" rather than "plays repeatedly") fibers?
That's a different issue to surface tension which stops the condensed out water flowing.
 

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I have never seen a saxophone that doesn’t collect some moisture (in the right conditions) or drips.

This is why baritones have purge valves and they collect condense even if they are spotless and new.
 

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I have never seen a saxophone that doesn’t collect some moisture (in the right conditions) or drips.

This is why baritones have purge valves and they collect condense even if they are spotless and new.
Sure. A while ago I posted a "why's my finger wet" post and got told!
None the less it would seem that some folk have bigger problems with it than others. Obviously ambient humidity and air temperature vary and matter... So does the surface quality of the horn.
 

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In the desert there is lots of dust but no horn would even have much or any condensation unless you have a “ still suit” like in Dune.

In a cold a humid place it will happen even if your horn has been cleaned to a shine (if that is at all possible).

Even the cleanest of the glass surfaces if you blow your warm breath on it will cloud, that’s water vapor , if the condensation happens to a higher speed than the evaporation (not in the desert) you will have droplets forming whether there is or not anything visible to aggregate around. Have enough droplets and they condense, then they will run down the condensation pipe (your horn) and collect in the first bow in their path. Along the way (gravity will make them chose the quickest path) they will find holes. Generally they won’t allow moisture to go out, but if your horn is hold at an angle the first open hole will allow moisture to drip our, on your fingers. It’s all gravity at work. Rain needs a kernel to condens water vapor doesn’t. You can condense any boiling liquid in the cleanest of bottles try it at home while setting a kettle of water for your tea.


 
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