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Which modification would be easier to do - sand the bore of a mouthpiece bigger or add a lining to make the bore smaller? I’m encountering the typical 2 mouthpiece, one horn problem. My jazz piece is much bigger and I am tired of always using Teflon tape.
 

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of course it makes hell of a difference is we are talking metal (which metal?) or hard rubber or any synthetic material.

If the tighter shank ( because that’s the part I think that you want to modify) is an HR or synthetic one , it will be easier and cheaper to alter that one.

Another option would be to have two necks and swap necks and mouthpieces together. It might not be cheaper but will allow you to have no alterations at all (always possible to have problems).
 

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The shank bore size is part of the design features of a mouthpiece. I don't know of any way to ream out the shank bore and keep it smooth, cylindrical and centered. There would have to be a way to chuck the mouthpiece up in a lathe and end up perfectly centered on the shank bore. And then, if it could be done properly, you just might find that you don't like the mouthpiece anymore.

Its possible that an insert could be made for your jazz mouthpiece. I don't think its as serious to make the shank bore a little smaller as it is to enlarge it. However, getting a second neck is really the best solution and you might find that you like a different neck for one of your applications.
 

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Which modification would be easier to do - sand the bore of a mouthpiece bigger or add a lining to make the bore smaller? I’m encountering the typical 2 mouthpiece, one horn problem. My jazz piece is much bigger and I am tired of always using Teflon tape.
Sanding, making a sleeve would be a lot of work and may not help. The sleeve would have to be very thin. If you sand you can do a little at a time whereas a sleeve you'd pretty much be stuck with whatever size you made. No, sanding or boring is the way to go. Just be patient, it may take you a while. Phil Barone
 

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The shank bore size is part of the design features of a mouthpiece. I don't know of any way to ream out the shank bore and keep it smooth, cylindrical and centered. There would have to be a way to chuck the mouthpiece up in a lathe and end up perfectly centered on the shank bore. And then, if it could be done properly, you just might find that you don't like the mouthpiece anymore.

Its possible that an insert could be made for your jazz mouthpiece. I don't think its as serious to make the shank bore a little smaller as it is to enlarge it. However, getting a second neck is really the best solution and you might find that you like a different neck for one of your applications.
You could use a reamer, not have to chuck it and it could be done so it just went in a little bit, just to the end of the cork. No, it wouldn't change the sound or feel. I personally would use a sanding disc on the end of a flexshaft though, not a lathe and do a little at a time with a fine wheel. Phil Barone
 

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Another option would be to have two necks and swap necks and mouthpieces together. It might not be cheaper but will allow you to have no alterations at all (always possible to have problems).
I’ve recenctly gone this route. I bought a cheap ( $80 shipped) Chinese SBA style meck that fits my horn perferctly and use it for the smaller bore mouthpieces I play around with
I guess I’m not supposed to say it but the cheapie neck doesn’t sound any different to me than my Selmer neck. It has the odd ridges in the tenon part that I’ve seen guys say they engineered specifically for their Chinese neck they get branded for them.
I’d like to get one of those boutique necks but I’ll wait for one to pop up second hand. I refuse to drop $1300 on a neck unless it was an original vintage Selmer neck.
If it’s not drastic bore difference you can always dip your neck cork in some hot water to expand it.
 

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Phil is obviously the expert here, but I'll put in my two cents anyway.

I recently had the same problem with two soprano mouthpieces. My problem was compounded by the fact that my main soprano does not have a detachable neck. I decided to "ream" the shank of the smaller mouthpiece, and I'd recommend this as the way to do it. It was very easy, I just wrapped a thin piece of very fine (400 grit) sandpaper around the (removeable) neck of my backup soprano and reamed the inside of the mouthpiece by slowly rotating it around the sandpapered neck.

If you use this method, you don't have to worry about centering. You're removing very little material and the cork on the neck keeps the sandpaper tight against the inside of the piece. Just do a tiny bit at a time and check the fit against your other mouthpiece frequently.

As Phil said, this shouldn't noticeably affect the sound (most of the shank bore will be filled with the neck cork anyway).
 

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Hi, I had this issue with my Yamaha bari sax for years. One day a saw a new Yamaha neck on eBay for $100. I bought it and the problem is solved.
 

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I recently had the same issue , what I did was take a mesurement of the larger of the mouthpieces and since work where we have a machine shop I borrowed a reamer , keep in mind that you only need to open the smaller bore mouthpiece very slightly , maybe a couple of thousands, I did this while holding the mouthpiecesame in my hand with a tee handle on the reamer, rubber mouthpiece was very easy ,
 

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I recently had the same issue , what I did was take a mesurement of the larger of the mouthpieces and since work where we have a machine shop I borrowed a reamer , keep in mind that you only need to open the smaller bore mouthpiece very slightly , maybe a couple of thousands, I did this while holding the mouthpiecesame in my hand with a tee handle on the reamer, rubber mouthpiece was very easy ,
The problem with a reamer is if you go it just a little too far the sound will change and we don't want that. Also, it's such a small amount that you have to take off that it would be easy to remove too much. I'm surprised you had a reamer the right size. Mouthpieces are usually odd sizes or was yours a regular size? Phil
 

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Adjustable reamer, baby! Expensive, but worth it.

Easy to keep from going too far: simply wrap some masking tape around the reamer at a distance equal to how far your MP goes on the neck, plus a couple millimeters. Stop feeding the reamer forward when you reach that point.

Probably want to use some oil to prevent chatter as the adjustable reamer isn't as stiff as a fixed one. Personally I would use olive oil, as it's harmless both to you and the mouthpiece.

Hard rubber is so soft you can ream holding the MP in your hand. Metal, you will probably have to improvise a way to hold the MP in a vise without damaging it. If you aren't qualified to figure out how to hold the mouthpiece in a vise without damaging it then you probably shouldn't be attacking your mouthpiece with sharp tools.

I have done this multiple times; unfortunately I now work in a company that doesn't own a set of adjustable blade reamers, and I haven't had the nerve to spend the money on a set for myself. (The "Import" ones MSC sells are only good as scrap metal; the standard is "Cleveland" brand, but as already noted, spendy.)
 

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There are inexpensive adjustable reamers from China. Less than $10. But I am not sure you can insert them far enough. They may bottom out on some small throat mouthpiece designs before the blades gets into the shank. Also, many mouthpieces have a taper shank bore.

I just use a rotary tool with burs and sanding drums along with calipers to judge progress. The neck cork is pretty forgiving if you end up a little out of round.

Even if you coat the inside with epoxy, hand sanding or rotary tool sanding is needed to dial in a final shape.
 

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There are inexpensive adjustable reamers from China. Less than $10.
I made the mistake of ordering some of these for the machine shop. They were completely useless. Sucked it up and bought some Cleveland brand. Excellent results.

I'm sure there are some European and Japanese brands that are also excellent, but in the USA my go-to source is MSC and they only carry "Import" (= scrap metal) and Cleveland.

They may bottom out on some small throat mouthpiece designs before the blades gets into the shank

True, the adjustable blade reamers have some bits out front.

Also, many mouthpieces have a taper shank bore Which in my opinion ought to be corrected before shipping out from the factory anyway, so reaming it just finishes up what the manufacturer should have done. Leaving the bore with a taper is just abysmally poor manufacturing practice which relies on the resilience of the neck cork to kind of work for a while. Until you are playing outdoors on a hot day, want to pull out, and the MP falls off the cork.
 

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Adjustable reamer, baby! Expensive, but worth it.

Easy to keep from going too far: simply wrap some masking tape around the reamer at a distance equal to how far your MP goes on the neck, plus a couple millimeters. Stop feeding the reamer forward when you reach that point.

Probably want to use some oil to prevent chatter as the adjustable reamer isn't as stiff as a fixed one. Personally I would use olive oil, as it's harmless both to you and the mouthpiece.

Hard rubber is so soft you can ream holding the MP in your hand. Metal, you will probably have to improvise a way to hold the MP in a vise without damaging it. If you aren't qualified to figure out how to hold the mouthpiece in a vise without damaging it then you probably shouldn't be attacking your mouthpiece with sharp tools.

I have done this multiple times; unfortunately I now work in a company that doesn't own a set of adjustable blade reamers, and I haven't had the nerve to spend the money on a set for myself. (The "Import" ones MSC sells are only good as scrap metal; the standard is "Cleveland" brand, but as already noted, spendy.)
Wow, an adjustable reamer, how nice. I'm impressed. Phil Barone
 

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My experience is similar to turf3. But I used a standard reamer for alto. Alto is very close to 5/8 inch. The shop at work has several reamers really close to 5/8 inch. So I used those (maybe 0.627 or 0.628 inches). Not sure precisely the size for tenor. Maybe it doesn't match up to standard reamer sizes so well.

And like turf3 says, rubber you can just hold the mouthpiece in your hand if you're steady and have done similar before. And use masking tape to set the depth to just enlarge the bore where it sits on the cork. (And you're only taking off a few thousands, typically.)

I was also able to do brass without a clamp or vise also, but agree with turf3 that if you "aren't qualified . . . you shouldn't be attacking your mouthpiece". But do note that the reamers cut rubber and brass a bit differently, given how the material reacts under the cutter. The two will feel slightly different in how tight they are on the cork, but only slightly. The cork will make up the tiny difference. I made all my mouthpieces match (within the limits of materials), and can use any with the same cork on the neck.
 

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of course it makes hell of a difference is we are talking metal (which metal?) or hard rubber or any synthetic material.

If the tighter shank ( because that’s the part I think that you want to modify) is an HR or synthetic one , it will be easier and cheaper to alter that one.

Another option would be to have two necks and swap necks and mouthpieces together. It might not be cheaper but will allow you to have no alterations at all (always possible to have problems).
I've done this with two of my baritones, 12M and YBS61.
The extra neck I use on the Yamaha is a Jupiter Bari neck and it tunes even better than the Yamaha neck.
On the 12M I use a remake of the original which also seems to tune just slightly better.
The Jupiter neck was cheap and needed no adjustment to fit either, the other was not as cheap but a great investment all the same.
I find that by having one with a thicker cork and one thinner I can accomodate any mouthpiece without too much trouble.
 

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yes, along with the “ jazz “( whatever that means :) ) mouthpiece you can select your “ jazz” neck and everything is fine and dandy.
 

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The problem with a reamer is if you go it just a little too far the sound will change and we don't want that. Also, it's such a small amount that you have to take off that it would be easy to remove too much. I'm surprised you had a reamer the right size. Mouthpieces are usually odd sizes or was yours a regular size? Phil
If I remember correctly I am pretty sure that I used a 27mm ream, as the mouthpieces that I use were a link stm and a Yannagisawa the link being the larger of the two, once this was done I then replaced the neck cork, also looking inside the neck bore of the Yanni you could see and measure down the bore to where the original mold or machining stopped and as mentioned in an earlier post just wrap a piece of tape around the ream so as not to go to deep, this did not change the chamber at all, very easy and did not change the sound in any way to my ears, worked out perfectly now I can and do use the Yanni when I want or the link without any issues or Teflon tape
 

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Sanding by hand can work well prevodied the difference isn't too great and you have plenty of time. Or else, for refusing the diameter this looks good to me:


However I will repeat (and I'm surprised nobody else has mentioned this, it's worth comparing these two piece along with several others.

One of them is likely to be standard, while the other is too large/small

If the "standard" one is tight or loose, then recork the neck so it fits the standard piece, and then work on the other mouthpiece to make it more "standard" Otherwise every time you try a different mouthpiece you will have issues.
 
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