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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m a constant follower of Bob Reynolds. In my mind one of the greatest around and so much great insights for a sax lover like myself. He just came out with a YouTube piece on Autumn Leaves, one of my favorite classics.


He is analyzing the take of Eva Cassidy of that piece. First of all: That is just a mind blowing take of that song. Period. When l listened to Bob’s analysis, it basically changed my whole mind setting of music. Like how do you (really) have to approach a song and think what it has to say to you. Watch how Bob throws the notes on the table! Like when you play something, what does the melody really mean to you.

The whole video is full of real pearls from Bob Reaynolds. You are listening to a guy that technically can play just anything he wants. However, he turns the focus elsewhere. Like what do you really want to say with you music. He is using Eva Cassidy to guide us to that place. A perfect choice…
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did some extra checking on this tecording.

Bob points out the piano solo on this take. In a follow up after some 10-20 years after the recording, the musicians were listening and sharing stuff on it. They had two nights to create the material (and all their money invested in it). The first evening recordings were lost to technical issues. The second evening was the one and only chance.

The pianist said the he told Eva that nobody plays Autumn Leaves in that key, but she insisted on it! Therefore he had to
play very carefully not to slip any wrong notes into it. It was the the only take there would ever be…
 

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I enjoy Bobs stuff and have always loved ECs version of the piece as well as the rest of that album. But… to be real about this…Bob doesn’t analyze the piece or this interpretation. He just comments on it and conveys his love of it.

Nothing wrong with that. It’s just not analysis.
 

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I'm rather embarrassed to admit I wasn't familiar with her until I saw Bob's video. Have done more listening and will say someone who doesn't tear up hearing her version of Over the Rainbow has a lump of stone rather than a heart.
Absolutely correct! Branford Marsalis says it all the time. When you play, you have to touch the listener. You’re not playing to impress your band mates. Like Bob said, when you take a melody, think about what you want to say with THAT melody (in this case Over the Rainbow). In her both solo performances on Autumn Leaves and Over the Rainbow she just takes them to stratosphere! and beyond! Never heard anything like that!!

She was just a gigging singer in local clubs making her living of all kinds of odd jobs. Her raw talent is incredible. After she sung just a few bars of Autumn Leaves, I realized that this is once in a lifetime phenomenon. That the record producers let her slip through their fingers is unbelievable and a perfect example of their Apple approach (= we’ll tell you what you like to hear).

What a coincidence that Bob, as well, has three rejections from record companies. He’s got a video on that. You have a hint of it in this video as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I enjoy Bobs stuff and have always loved ECs version of the piece as well as the rest of that album. But… to be real about this…Bob doesn’t analyze the piece or this interpretation. He just comments on it and conveys his love of it.

Nothing wrong with that. It’s just not analysis.
OK, but it did something to me (whatever it was).
 

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Ngl, i have a huge mancrush on Bob Reynolds, not only did he teach me how to be my own best music educator, he also taught me how i learn in general. I use everything i learned about myself and my learning processes across music, physical training to alpine skiing. He’s a great saxophonist, but an even better educator!
 

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I’m a constant follower of Bob Reynolds. In my mind one of the greatest around and so much great insights for a sax lover like myself. He just came out with a YouTube piece on Autumn Leaves, one of my favorite classics.


He is analyzing the take of Eva Cassidy of that piece. First of all: That is just a mind blowing take of that song. Period. When l listened to Bob’s analysis, it basically changed my whole mind setting of music. Like how do you (really) have to approach a song and think what it has to say to you. Watch how Bob throws the notes on the table! Like when you play something, what does the melody really mean to you.

The whole video is full of real pearls from Bob Reaynolds. You are listening to a guy that technically can play just anything he wants. However, he turns the focus elsewhere. Like what do you really want to say with you music. He is using Eva Cassidy to guide us to that place. A perfect choice…
I did a solo gig at a wedding recently and used Eva Cassidy's interpretation of many songs on tenor sax. Her emotional voicing to me is so perfect for rendering on sax. I started with Songbird (Fleetwood Mac one) and use Karaoke Version to do the backing track. Followed that with about 10 of her other songs including Autumn Leaves. So good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I did a solo gig at a wedding recently and used Eva Cassidy's interpretation of many songs on tenor sax. Her emotional voicing to me is so perfect for rendering on sax. I started with Songbird (Fleetwood Mac one) and use Karaoke Version to do the backing track. Followed that with about 10 of her other songs including Autumn Leaves. So good.

👍👍! I’m trying to get into that as well (which seems quite impossible). Her key choices are original. I started with flute followed by tenor and soprano. Haven’t tried alto or bari yet, but I will. So far soprano seems to be the best fit soundwise.
 

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Great video from Bob. Goosebumps are an understatement. I can't think of any artist who has invoked a more emotional reaction from me than Eva Cassidy. The Danny Boy recording & Somewhere Over the Rainbow especially. I love jazz because of its intellectual challenge but her music hits the soul hard.
 

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Thanks for sharing. It says a lot about the kind of dead end jazz was heading into in the 60s. The Beatles have been blamed, which actually might be more another symptom than the cause.
Getting rid of "songs", the typical II-V-I sequences and derivates, was a very cool move, symbolized by Miles' Kind Of Blue.
But wasn't it also a move away from the connection to the listener ?
What Eva Cassidy embodies is the the exact opposite. A song, a melody, a story, a connection to the soul. I almost forgot space and lyrics.
Her Blues In The Night is .... killing.
Again, it is really cool to hear such thoughts from a musician.
 
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