Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Wish he were here to celebrate it. Always one of my favorites. Miss you, Bob!


 

·
Distinguished SOTW member
Joined
·
4,673 Posts
I wasn't even aware that he was no longer with us... thanks for posting. Great soprano playing, love the very Shorter like tone he gets at 4:36, a quote from "Native Dancer"?

Such a tragic an banal way to go.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Berg
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
28,511 Posts
I listen to Bob all the time, and while I love his playing, it always brings with it the sad awareness of the tragic loss of his unnecessary early death.

Happy Birthday Bob, your life was a gift for all of us, I only wish we could give you something in return.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Thanks for posting this JB! What a shame to lose this special human being, such an amazing player.

Great to hear his soprano playing in this video, every bit as compelling as his tenor playing.

I feel fortunate to have had a chat with him after a gig he was playing with bassist Gary Willis, it was really interesting to hear him speak about how much he hated blathering about saxophone 'gear', he put his Mark VI tenor in my hands and it was an absolute mess, lots of 'play' in the keywork, corks missing, funny actually. When I made mention of it he launched into a huge diatribe about wasting time on 'gear'!

I'm sure many have seen this, if not, enjoy, a great band of Horace' and fun tune, Bob is tearing it up, as always!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMbffu7dsow

Thanks to all for contributing to this thread, best, DC
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
28,511 Posts
Those videos on the Tube with Horace are real gems. Everybody was cookin' with gas to the max.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
631 Posts
thanks for posting. great clip. what a giant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
thanks for the post...I am now on a Bob Berg listening kick.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
Joined
·
6,260 Posts
True to his roots, saxophonist Bob Berg was a gifted performer that
absorbed different strands of cultural influences into his music. He was
astonishing. Supremely confident, propulsive and in precise control.
Bob was a down to earth guy to. Totally Brooklyn! You could feel New York in
his vibe.

He was a regular guy. The kind of person you could rap to about life
in New York, fishing, art or cars. He was that cool! Before we lost him..I
had lunch with him at length and talked about a lot of interesting things.
About life,,and about music. Just about a year before he was killed...we went
for a ride in his new Cadillac. It was a perfect car for Bob. So as we pull out
and hit Broadway...Bob looks at me and sais..." Yo Tim...check this **** out".
And out of the CD player...comes > Sam Butera & Louie Prima !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Bob looked at me and said.." I can't help it...I'm from Brooklyn !! ". lol.
In the same ride we listened to Stan Getz w/ Kenny Barron.
Bob Berg lived life as an artist, but most of all as a fantastic person to all
who knew him. Everyone loved him! He had that kind of vibe.


Bob was one of the most well respected tenors in America; and impressed
everyone in the jazz world with his thoughtful and passionate playing on both
his solo albums and in his turns as a sideman through the years with the cream
of the jazz crop.
His composing was stellar, and should be taken as a just estimation of his
considerable talents, as well as evidence of his excellent talent as a world
class proven player of the highest value.
The unparalleled art form of jazz is best defined by the musical legacies of
its master artists.Bob was a master musician.


But even further than that.He got down to the nitty gritty when he played.
To say Bob Berg kicked butt when he played would be a slight understatement.
ONCE...IN AN OLDER SAX jOURNAL REVIEW....I described Bob energy
wise as " His energy would make most heavy metal bands look like the house band
at a nursing home". LOL~
More often than not, he just tore the music a new backside and left his mark of
artistry as the smoke cleared! As with all things associated with change, jazz
and all it's elements is constantly evolving and will continue to do so for the
next hundred years. His particular style of music may well be one of the
influences we identify as significant in the annals of jazz history.Everytime
he played his horn was a triumph, with no digressions.

Every person I speak to....about Bob Berg's artistry has a different story
about how his playing has touched them.
No matter who you were or what you were into...Berg reached out and touched you through his playing. He was that emotional, he was that profound.


Bob Berg's playing and music was real, relevant and personally affecting. His
musical being was loaded with compassion, and respect. I'm glad I had the
opportunity to experience him as an artist and friend. My section mate alto player John Signorelli, was the guy who laid a Balanced tenor on Bob and a few mouthpieces. As John was living in the same building in Brooklyn that Bob as a teen grew up in. ( John Signorelli was in the Harry James band with me at that time- and taught all those guys like Bob,Liebs etc etc reed making/technique etc. John was a great player who made a name for himself in the Gene Krupa bands and NYC scene. Imagine having HIM for your neighbor!! ) John used to crack me up with these Berg storys and stuff like Bob playing note for note solos with Getz or Newk. When, years later I told Bob about it- he was saying how hip John was and also kind. He was a killer lead alto guy- who I dug to play with. He made my time with Harry James hysterical as we were the only two East Coast guys in the band then.

What an inspiration he is to all of us! I miss him and the music is EMPTY without his voice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Thanks for you insight Tim, as always, you 'humanize' the amazing crowd of peers with whom you came up.

Bob WAS the very 'essence' of the music to me, he committed every single note, every single time he 'sang' through his horns.

I gotta go listen to the man...now, thanks again, best, DC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
"listening to Stan Getz and Kenny Barron". One of the all time great tenor records. The guy definitely knew what to listen to and how to play. He always played with that fire that was unmistakably him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Wow, TP, you almost brought me to tears with that. I remember when you took that ride with Bob and telling us about it at Roberto's. Hanging with Bob on those occasions was one of the things that kept me in New York. He was so cool, supportive, and genuine to us youg players that looked up to him. Two of my best memories are when Bob got me into The Iridium and the Blue Note to see him with Steps Ahead and on the breaks he would come and sit at our table and shoot the ****, really taking the time to hang and talk and chill before going back to play. No attitude or "big timing" at all. Just a guy that loved music and hanging out with other cats that felt the same way. I remember the day he died and how it was just like we had all been punched in the gut, just sitting around in silence. Bob was the perfect example of truly making his personality heard through his horn: intense, gritty, funky, complex, no ********, but full of love. I miss him.

Luke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
This thread reminded me to pull out my CD of "Enter the Spirit". Damn, that's a good album. Except for the cover photo - much chest hair. Anyway BB does a spanking cover of Sonny Rollins' No Moe. Oh yeah. Some great soprano playing on there too.

Made me revisit "Short Stories" - that one is not bad either, if you can get past the "fusion" trappings that where all the rage back then.

His playing reminds me a lot of Brecker, except more unbuttoned, a bit looser - maybe even a bit out of control : )
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top