Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm really frustrated right now. I've been playing alto sax for eight years; and I've never had a teacher get really in-depth about things.
I don't have a set warm-up routine. I know I have to do long tones, but I don't know exactly what exercises to do. I'm unbelievably busy and only have time for a half hour to a little over an hour a day, but I need core exercises to work on.
My tone's a little whiny. I use Rico 3 reeds, a Rovner dark lig, and an E. Rousseau NC4 mouthpiece on a YAS-23. I think part of the problem is that I have a bad habit of biting, but I don't know how to get out of that habit. I know long tones will help this, but... see above paragraph.


Also, on a side note, sometimes when I'm playing, my sax does this thing where it'll break into this weird sort of groaning growl thing. It usually does it when I go from any note above D (on the staff) to a high G, or sometimes an A. I don't know why it does that, and I've tried changing my embouchure and airstream to fix it, which hasn't worked. Does anyone know what could be going on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
If I am correct, then you are experiencing problems with your throat setting. Look up matching overtones and throat setting on google. The position of your throat column has a huge impact. And if you want a warm up, mine is overtones to palm key f# then all 12 major complete scales (starting on the note of the scale going up the entire range of the horn and back down the entire range and then back to the starting note and always in the major key of the starting note with the goal being to have each note sound the exact same played with the exact same length) and then a slow etude. I got this warm up from a former student of Harvey Pittel's (director of saxophone at the University of Texas at austin) and Mr. Pittel uses what I described as part of his everyday warm up. It helps a lot with tone throughout the entire range of the horn and keeping even fingers so I don't play unintended notes.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
The cure for biting: warm up with a double embouchure (no teeth on top of mouthpiece) and soft (low volume) overtones. Another good exercise to loosen up and also focus your air is to play a descending chromatic scale starting on high C down middle C. Start by playing the regular note, then with the same fingering make it sound a half step lower, then switch to the regular corresponding note and start over.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top