Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I want to share this cool way of transposing melodies connecting them with a "pivot note", that act as a "lego block" between the two keys. Hope you enjoy the video, if you have any suggestion post your comment. Turn on english subs in the menu.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
Excellent video and I'm particularly glad to hear you advocating using the voice first. I think this is critical to becoming a good musician. I feel very badly for students who are only taught to read while being taught to play. If they are strictly developing an eye to hand reaction without necessarily hearing the note they are going to play, then they are not becoming musicians. Very sad and very unmusical. It's paramount to make the connection from mind/ear to the horn/instrument, especially if one ever wants to become an improviser. Again I feel very sorry for players who are strictly taught to copy and practice riffs and just play chord tones/arpeggios to charts without hearing the melodic possibilities. Doesn't matter how quickly they can "cut and paste" their well practiced riffs and arpegios. In the ears of an audience it says nothing other than the player has practiced a lot. Music is about communication. If all one can say to their audience is that they have fast fingers, that's pretty limited communication. Our job is entertainment. Telling stories, creating moods, giving people something to dance to, etc. NOT just trying to impress them with our fast fingers that ultimately say nothing.

Once again so glad to hear that at least you are teaching a next generation to hear and give meaning to what they play. Next, hopefully we can also leave the 1950s behind and play in styles relevant to the present remembering our job is to communicate to the audiences of today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thank you. You are absolutely right saying that there are a lot of people who don't pay attention to develop their ear training skills. I experienced that 90% of the times when a student of mine is not able to play a phrase (it could be because of notes, rhythm of both) he is not able to sing it correctly. When he/she can sing it he/she is able to correct the wrong notes or rhythm. Developing the ability to sing a melody in your head and transfer it on the sax is not only an ear training thing, is also an ability to react on what you are hearing and it is essential to react to the other musicians who you are playing with!
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top