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R.I.P.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I celebrate that I heard his music. Thank you, Bill.

For those that have never heard of him, check it out. No excuses for missing out on this man's contributions.
 

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A friend of mine recounted when Watrous walked into a One o’Clock rehearsal at North Texas and asked, “Don’t they have an accounting school here? I’m not working so what makes you think you’re going to work”.
Brutal, but true.
 

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I remember the first time I heard him on some music my band director was playing as class was starting.
I was like whoa! WTH is this!?!?!?
Been meaning to see him around town forever, but never had the time...
RIP...
 

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I attended a trombone clinic given by Bill Watrous at the University of Utah hoping to learn something that would improve my brass teaching. As usual the clinic quickly got to the questions about his mouthpiece and equipment. His answer was, "For several years I spent a lot of time and money trying different set ups and discovered that in two weeks I sounded the same as I always did. Then I learned that in order to sound different, I needed to change my concept." At that time and place in the 1970's my search for the holy grail of sax mouthpieces ended. Thanks Bill.
 

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A tremendous player with incredible chops and good taste. I always enjoyed his work and was very fortunate to have heard him many years back. Sorry to hear the news.
 

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Those of us of a "certain age" fondly remember his two Manhattan Wildlife Refuge albums from the mid-1970s. Less well-known: in the mid-1960s he did a couple of easy-listening albums, one called "In Love Again" under the name William Russell Watrous and the other, with The Walter Raim Concept, ‎"Love Themes For The Underground, The Establishment & Other Sub Cultures Not Yet Known." Oh yeah.

His NY Times obit mentions that he almost joined a minor league baseball team when he was in his 40s.

He was so fluid with incredible range, speed, and lyricism, and he made it all look completely effortless. He also tended to blather endlessly when he was fronting a big band, which I heard him do on a few occasions. I always had the feeling he was trying to play as little as possible, or maybe rest as much as possible between numbers. Maybe it wasn't as effortless as it looked. Trombone-playing isn't for the faint of heart and he kept it up at an incredibly high level into his 70s and for all I know basically until the end of his life.
 

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In the 70s I was at UC Northridge.
I wasn't in the A band but would listen in.
Bill was working with the trombone section.
They were having trouble with articulation so he played flight of the Bumblebee up to speed and tongued every note faster than I could play it on the flute.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Those of us of a "certain age" fondly remember his two Manhattan Wildlife Refuge albums from the mid-1970s.
Yes!

Maybe it wasn't as effortless as it looked. Trombone-playing isn't for the faint of heart and he kept it up at an incredibly high level into his 70s...
Amen. I’ve a friend that has been playing bass trombone for 50+ years, that had a shoulder rebuild a couple years ago. Tough. Committed.
 

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Those of us of a "certain age" fondly remember his two Manhattan Wildlife Refuge albums from the mid-1970s. Less well-known: in the mid-1960s he did a couple of easy-listening albums, one called "In Love Again" under the name William Russell Watrous and the other, with The Walter Raim Concept, ‎"Love Themes For The Underground, The Establishment & Other Sub Cultures Not Yet Known." Oh yeah.

His NY Times obit mentions that he almost joined a minor league baseball team when he was in his 40s.

He was so fluid with incredible range, speed, and lyricism, and he made it all look completely effortless. He also tended to blather endlessly when he was fronting a big band, which I heard him do on a few occasions. I always had the feeling he was trying to play as little as possible, or maybe rest as much as possible between numbers. Maybe it wasn't as effortless as it looked. Trombone-playing isn't for the faint of heart and he kept it up at an incredibly high level into his 70s and for all I know basically until the end of his life.
Rackety - I guess you and I are of that same certain age, LOL. Watrous and members of the Manhattan Wildlife Refuge did a clinic and concert for area high school stage bands in NJ in the early 70's which my HS band took part in. The concert at night was terrific. I can recall a few weeks later playing the "MWR" recording for our band's piano player's Father (himself a Bass player) who refused to believe that Watrous wasn't playing a valve trombone. He could articulate that fast and that cleanly. Beautiful tone too!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
saxophone, flutes and lil' bit of clarinet
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Very sad. Hadn’t heard. Thanks
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2012
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