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I have bought the Korg TM-40 Tuner, but it is not reading my notes right, and I have checked on youtube for other players, and it does the same. Below is what it reads:

It reads the below:

Sax-->TM-40

B --> D "Should be B"
A--> C "Should be A"
G--> B flat "Should be G"
E-->G# "Should be E"


What's wrong? can you help?
 

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Is it a "CA-40"?

The tuner is reading concert pitch either because it does not transpose or because you have not set it to transpose for an Eb instrument.

I'm not familiar with the "TM"-40 but I suspect it is not a transposing tuner.
 

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For the longest time i was using a Sabine MT9000 but switched to the Korg TM-40 after accidentally leaving my beloved Sabine onstage at the Reno jazz festival back in 2006.
 

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What do you all think is the best tuner for the sax? Yamaha TD-1 looks pretty compact, but are there better ones?

Is there some ideal one that combines both tuner and metronome together?

What's your take on:

1) Best pure tuner

2) Best combination tuner/metronome

Thanks in advance!
1) I use a KORG chromatic DT-2 That I have owned and used for 22 years. Its still great. I would suggest a comparable chromatic tuner from the KORG range.
 

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While we're on the topic of tuners, has anyone any experience with the operation of the Center Pitch CP2 tuner?

http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Center-Pitch-CP2-Clampon-Chromatic-Tuner?sku=210011&src=3WWRWXGB&ZYXSEM=0
The Center Pitch tuner is unsuited for use on most saxophones, because it is designed to clamp onto the instrument (trumpet) and there is no place to attach it to the saxophone body that doesn't interfere with keywork and be visible while playing. It will work with some altos and tenors. I don't have a sop to try it on, so I can't help there.
 

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I have bought the Korg TM-40 Tuner, but it is not reading my notes right, and I have checked on youtube for other players, and it does the same. Below is what it reads:

It reads the below:

Sax-->TM-40

B --> D "Should be B"
A--> C "Should be A"
G--> B flat "Should be G"
E-->G# "Should be E"

What's wrong? can you help?
As the other poster(s) said, I don't think that's a transposing tuner. It's just showing you what you're playing on your alto -- which IS a transposing instrument in E-flat -- showing it to you in the "absolute", or 'concerrt pitch'. When you look at and play a 'C' on your alto for example, your alto ACTUALLY sounds, and your tuner "hears" an E-flat in 'reality' -- or concert pitch. Your alto has actually been fooling you all along, because it actually sounds notes (tones) a major sixth interval LOWER than what you've been reading and playing. That's just what your tuner's been telling you, accurately, all along.
 

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B --> D "Should be B"
A--> C "Should be A"
G--> B flat "Should be G"
E-->G# "Should be E"

What's wrong? can you help?
As Rex said, the tuner is reading the notes in concert pitch. However, there's something wrong with that last one. When you play E on the alto, the concert pitch is G, not G#. OTOH, if you're playing a tenor or soprano, something is way off. You don't state what horn you're playing, but given the info above I'll assume alto.
 

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I also use the Cleartune app and it works great. I am getting pretty good over the years at hearing relative pitch so I use it for extreme conditions most the time. It is good for long tones though to make sure the pitch is perfect throughout the excercise.
 

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Guys,

I am still a beginner in Alto sax, I bought this tuner to enhance my playing, so I didn't undertstand what you mean by conerct pitch or transposing, is my sax wrong? or my playing is wrong? How can make the TM-40 play the notes right? I have used an external mic and I placed on the bell, and it still it reads B as D and A as C.

Can you please explain to me more? Should I return this tuner as it is not sax tuner?
 

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danix4u,

That's what it should read for the transposing Eb alto saxophone.

 

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so if I understand this correctly, I am playing the right note lets say "B" and the TM-40 hear it as "D" as in C instrument. So my Alto is Eb instrument, and my tuner is for C instrument.

How can change my TM-40 to Eb instrument? there is calibrate buttons on it with different frequences, goes from 410 to 480. Which freq should I tune in the Tuner so it can read my Eb notes?

I bought this tuner based on its reviews on this website, and I am worndering how sax players who own the same Korg TM-40 can use it to tune thier playing?

Please help me, if it is not the right tuner, let me know and I will return back.
 

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danix4u,

Tuners are all Concert unless they have some feature to read out in other scales. You don't need to get into that now!

saxmanglen gave you everything you need, the transposing table. In a concert band the Director might ask players to play a "Concert" A. For the alto that will be an F# since it is an Eb instrument (just refer to the table). Don't get caught up on needing to see the same note on the tuner as what your fingers are playing. Use the table above, play whatever note you choose, and make certain you are seeing the correct note in "Concert" pitch.

Here's what you do: Play F# on the alto, the tuner will read A.

The important point is for you to know whether you are then sharp or flat and to be able to adjust the mouthpiece on the neck accordingly. Are you okay on that part?
 

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2Tonic covered it well.

On your adjustable "calibration", the most common standard is 440. Keep it at that and you'll be fine.


Adjustable Calibration
The TM-40's Calibration setting is adjustable in a range of 410~480 Hz to accommodate a variety of tuning standards.
 

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Though a tuner might help to discover the tendencies of the intonation of the saxophone, you really need to train your ear to play in tune.
lots of triads with octave, played slowly so you can "prehear" the note will get you on the way.
Or something very predictable with wider intervals ( if i were a bell.. intro, or raschers octaves, fourths and fifths exercise)

If you buy a tuner a korg is a good choice, I gave one to a guitar playing friend over 20 years ago ( first generation of tuners) and it's still in his guitar case, working just fine.
 

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Thanks Everyone, I didn't know that saxophone players need to adjust thier playing based on that table. so the Concert D is actually B on saxophone.

My question, why they didn't name them as concert notes, why making it complicated for us. They could name B as D, and A as C, and make it easy, why both note names?
 

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Good explanation there of why some tuners are not a good choice for a woodwind instrument. I.e., blown notes are so full of overtones that an "undamped" needle will swing wildly, whereas a tuner with a damped needle will average out the overtones and give an accurate reading. And I agree that a needle is preferable over a digital readout, because you can see even minor changes and swings with a needle that a digital won't register.
 
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