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My daughter's Korg TM-40 beats my CA-30 hands-down -- because it's a 2-in-one tuner/metronome, but I have to carry around the MA-30 as well. Actually though, my vote is for the Petersen VSAM, or any other higher-end Petersen tuner maybe? Generally the problem is these cheap things aren't loud enough.
 

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I have bought the Korg TM-40 Tuner, but it is not reading my notes right, and I have checked on youtube for other players, and it does the same. Below is what it reads:

It reads the below:

Sax-->TM-40

B --> D "Should be B"
A--> C "Should be A"
G--> B flat "Should be G"
E-->G# "Should be E"

What's wrong? can you help?
As the other poster(s) said, I don't think that's a transposing tuner. It's just showing you what you're playing on your alto -- which IS a transposing instrument in E-flat -- showing it to you in the "absolute", or 'concerrt pitch'. When you look at and play a 'C' on your alto for example, your alto ACTUALLY sounds, and your tuner "hears" an E-flat in 'reality' -- or concert pitch. Your alto has actually been fooling you all along, because it actually sounds notes (tones) a major sixth interval LOWER than what you've been reading and playing. That's just what your tuner's been telling you, accurately, all along.
 

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Thanks Everyone, I didn't know that saxophone players need to adjust thier playing based on that table. so the Concert D is actually B on saxophone.

My question, why they didn't name them as concert notes, why making it complicated for us. They could name B as D, and A as C, and make it easy, why both note names?
Explanation here: http://www.saxontheweb.net/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=228790&postcount=11: Why the full choir of transposing saxophones in different keys?

By the way, all common modern saxes are pitched at Bb or Eb. When saxes in these different keys play together, they have to play from music written on separate pages in 2 different keys.
 

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The arguments about this seem silly. The chromatic tuner is a versatile, useful tool. Alone in your room, what other reference do you have, if you don't have a whole bagful of tuning forks? Also works to facilitate initial tune-up in ensembles, even if tuning to the piano (you can calibrate the tuner, then pass it around), and periodic checkups after you've warmed up. Tuners aren't viewed as silly in concert ensemble practice and warm-up rooms -- why so for jazz, etc.?

Of course in performance, all pitch is relative. Wind and string instrumentalists, and vocalists do not perform in equal temperament. So what? Chromatic tuners are still useful for all of the above purposes, plus learning and adjusting to the tendencies of your instrument. That bagful of tuning forks isn't going to be of much use playing in-tune in an ensemble either.

The keys to me are to first know about where you are relative to the prevailing pitch, adjust as necessary (this may be a more or less continuous process as the night wears on), then match pitches (as applies) with those around you, and play your intervals/chords/scale degrees relative to the prevailing harmony correctly. No easy thing, and nothing much else to do about it except for a lot of listening and playing experience. It's a tough road if you aren't starting out with a fair amount of talent/discrimination/skill in this.
 
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