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I'm in 8th grade looking for intermediate to professional level books, currently trying to master altissimo range, tone quality, intonation, etc. Looking for more jazz orientated books, or the best book overall.
 

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SOTW Columnist and Forum Contributor 2015-2016
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Don't worry about jazz yet, just keep studying basic saxophone technique. The Klose & Ferling exercises are the go-to's...make sure you really, really know your scales. All modes, full range of the horn. (For example...C major would start on Low B, go all the way to high F, then land on low C). If you can incorporate altissimo into your scale studies, go ahead, but make sure it's perfectly in time and in tune, with a good strong tone.

Those two books alone at various tempos will take you through most of high school.

- Saxaholic
 

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Never heard of Ferling, is it "48 Famous Studies for Saxophone V.1" ?
Yes that's it. It's pretty much considered the go to book for saxophone. I like the version edited by Marcel Mule; he also adds in new etudes in the enharmonic keys.
 

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In terms of jazz, I think the best thing you can do is start transcribing. Do not use books for this. Listen and learn from recordings. For technique a google search will give you every sort of book out there.
 

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Formerly mdavej
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I'm in 8th grade looking for intermediate to professional level books, currently trying to master altissimo range, tone quality, intonation, etc. Looking for more jazz orientated books, or the best book overall.
Most of that stuff doesn't come from books, rather repetition and listening. Yes, you can get fingerings, patterns and technical exercises from a book, but the rest is just time, listening and discipline.

When I was your age, I would pick some altissimo notes and repeat them over and over until I could nail them every time and from different approach notes (within scales as others have recommended). For tone quality and intonation, play along with records (or Spotify these days). Try to find an artist with the tone and style you like, and imitate it. Keep at it until you sound the same. You'll naturally improve tone quality, embouchure and intonation when doing it this way.

Because I listened to records and tried to match them, I developed a great tone, good ear and learned lots of jazz style and licks very quickly, leapfrogging all my piers at the time. Playing along kills several birds with one stone. All the greats learned the same way, either by listening to records or to other musicians.
 
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