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Hi, I have seen some saxophone players who use pads very similar to the ones used on flutes is this some how considered an advantage to rolled tone hole saxophones? And are those white pads I see in anyway related to the ones used on flutes and clarinets? And would you recommend for a complete repad to stick with the flute pad style or just use regular leather pads?

Thanks!
 

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Regular pads are fine.
It’s how you seat them and whether the tone holes are levelled that makes the difference.
Some recommend soft thick pads because they are not willing or more likely not capable of leveling rolled tone holes the correct way.
 

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I have never seen anyone on saxophone using pads looking and made like flutes (unless you think of different pads as the ones I know)



Maybe you think that Kangaroo pads are like this, but they certainly aren’t




I agree, if the pads are leveled good pads will fit (provided a good fit, seal and everything esle) rolled, straight or beveled toneholes .

The only makers that seems to make something similar between flute and saxophones are those whom make synthetic pads , Jim Schmidt has gold and silver pads that he sells fpor both saxophone and flute, but they are not for rolled toneholes (by the way not all flutes have rolled toneholes)
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Conn made pads specially fro rolled tone holes which had a metal ring round the felt inside the leather. I had a set on oner 10M and the rings tended to cut through the leather. My current 10m has pads made by Freddy Gregory, no rings and they play just fine.
 

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It's very difficult to find Conn reso ring pads. MusicMedic had them but discontinued. Ferrees may still have them but are more difficult to purchase in small orders like a pad set.

I recently overhauled a 1930 Conn alto with MusicMedic soft thin pads with flat metal resos. They look a lot like the old Conn pads. You can also get white 'Roo pads from MM. Whether soft or their regular firm, the Conns that I've done work best with thin pads.
 

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It's very difficult to find Conn reso ring pads. MusicMedic had them but discontinued. Ferrees may still have them but are more difficult to purchase in small orders like a pad set.
Probably lack of demand as people finally realise there is no actual advantage, quite the opposite IMO.
 

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Probably lack of demand as people finally realise there is no actual advantage, quite the opposite IMO.
Yeah, I'd agree and, as you mentioned, there is a disadvantage when the ring rips through the edges of the pad.
 

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My Mexi-Conn still had a couple of these, and the leather was cut by the steel ring. I can't say that this caused premature failure when I consider the other non-reso-pads that were all the way down to the felt. So, while the ring cutting through the leather may be the failure mode, I am not convinced that it's necessarily causing early failures.

All that said, my understanding was that the intention was for them to be a press-fit, no-shellac pad. Personally I am not convinced that any of the no-shellac pads really work reliably that way. It's all well and good to say that you have to make the pad cup and tone hole be perfectly matched before you put in the pad and then you should be able to just install the pad, bottom it in the cup, and have it seal. That would make sense if the saxophone were made of tool steel and all the sheet metal were about three times as thick as it is. But my experience in the real world indicates that this "perfectly aligned" dream condition lasts about ten minutes after you actually start playing the thing. Once you put a few years on a pad set, with the unavoidable small bumps and grinds of a saxophone actually used for playing music, things are not so perfectly aligned any more. You could require that every pad replacement involve a lengthy process of making everything perfectly level again, but it sure is easier to put a normal pad in with a thick bed of shellac and be able to make tiny compensations in the shellac bed to get it to seal. (I am not talking about where things are seriously bent; I'm talking about normal imperfection.)
 

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Hi, I have seen some saxophone players who use pads very similar to the ones used on flutes is this some how considered an advantage to rolled tone hole saxophones? And are those white pads I see in anyway related to the ones used on flutes and clarinets?
No, the white pads that you see on some saxophones are made of white leather.

And would you recommend for a complete repad to stick with the flute pad style or just use regular leather pads?
Stick with saxophone pads on a saxophone. White, tan, or black, they are still leather. There is, however, variation in hardness due to the selection of felt for the layer underneath the leather cover. If a stiff ("hard") pad is used, it becomes more critical to have a level tone hole.
 
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