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Which Music Theroy books do people reccomend? I've searched here at SOTW and have not come up with a thread to review.

My history is that I played Tenor in high school and didn't pick up my horn for about 27 years. Started playing again 4 years ago - it all came back to me pretty quickly. I'm playing in a community band and working on improv with Aebersold play-alongs.
 

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Mark Levine's Jazz Theory book is quite comprehensive and well regarded on this board.
 

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+1 for the Mark Levine Jazz Theory book. It serves me well to this day.
 

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Yes, I did hear about that.
I drank a lot of beer with the Other Brothers.

I imagine you are familiar with the story of their childhoods and reunion...
 

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It depends on if you're talking jazz or classical. For jazz, the Levine book is great.

For standard classical theory, Tonal Harmony by Stefan Kostka and Dorthy Payne is the standard college text.
 

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I like the Levine book, too. There are tons of great examples and clear explanations, and he even knows enough to acknowledge the mystery that lurks in the music, like when he says this about how blues isn't explained well by traditional music theory (p. 234): "So why does the same blues scale--with so many "wrong" notes--sound so "right" when played by a jazz or blues musician over a three-chord blues? Your guess is as good as mine. It's not explainable in terms of Western music theory." Then he moves on.
 

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The Mark Levine book is good. Also check out these:

the Chord Scale Theory and Jazz Harmony by Barrie Nettles and Richard Braf. This is the Berklee harmony program in a book. Highly recommended. Get it only from Advance Music.

Jazz Theory and Practice by Richard Lawn and Jeffrey Hellmer
Very thorough treatment of jazz.

You can also find a growing library of lessons (many on jazz theory) on my site.
 
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