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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to get the RODE NT1a which I've been told is a great mic for the money, good for recording vocals, but I don't know if it's good for recording sax. If you know of any good mics for recording sax, which is also good for vocals Around £150 or under, I would be grateful if you would share!
Nick
 

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Any large diaphragm condenser mic that is good for recording vocals will be excellent for recording saxophone--the more expensive the better. I have a R0DE NT2A which I love for saxophone.
 

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OK. But when I asked a producer/sound engineer about the nt1000 he said if my room where i record isnt soundproofed it would pick up too much from outside and advised me to get nt1a. does the same apply to nt2a because the room doesnt have those acoustic absorption pads.
 

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Any high quality microphone will pick up sound from outside, and even electrical hum and the air moving through your ventilation ducts. Heck, low quality mics will do the same if the room is loud enough, or not insulated well. It has to do with the amount of extraneous sound, and NOT the microphone model. Condenser mics, ANY condenser mic will pick up that noise, not just the more expensive ones (they will just make the background noise sound better!).

Additionally, depending on the size and shape of your room, you may get what we call "standing waves". This is a phenomenon where the note that you are playing is harmonious with the dimensions of the room, and will keep ringing (reverberating) after you stop playing (or switch to another note). What will happen is that this will cause a build up of that particular frequency (or frequencies) and when you go to mix your song, you will instinctively EQ those frequencies down, and will end up with a finished song that lacks those frequencies and sound weired, or bad.

My suggestion, buy the best, most expensive microphone that you can afford, and then tackle the room noise issues when you have identified what needs to be done. I really like the NT2A, it has a nice warm lush sound, a little less gain than my AT 3035, but I like the sound better. Yes, I've used MUCH more expensive mics, but for the money I think the NT2A is a great choice.

There are many low budget tricks to sound proofing a room, ranging from tacking carpet or heavy blankets to the walls, to gluing egg crate foam to ply wood panels and setting those up around your recording area, to building "bass traps" to out of large cardboard cylinders covered with carpet and filled with foam and put in the corners of your room, to stuffing old t-shirts in the cracks of doors and windows and ventilation ducts. Be careful because some of these can cause fire hazards if permanently installed.

Search the web sound proofing and you will find lots of info.
 

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The very best a mic can do is to give an accurate electrical representaion of the sound present.

Soundproofing a room can be absolutely necessary, or a complete waste of time and money - depending on how much extraneous noise is present - the other reason to soundproof is the your souns annoys the heck out of somebody else...

1 - Sort the sound in the room

2 - Record it.
 
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