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Who do you guys think is the go to clarinet tech for doing a overhaul on a horn. I have an old R13 and I've never had anything done to it. It's starting to have some issues. I'm thinking if I'm going to pay to have it done I might as well go for a clarinet guy. Thanks, Steve
 

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Steve Sklar
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The guys at Wichita Band Instrument Co.

That'd be my top choice clarinet techs in the states

OH I forgot Dave Spiegethal.
 

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Mike Lutley at Meyer Music in Grand Rapids MI.
He used to work for Yamaha before they closed up shop.
After he did the work on my bari I won't take my horns to anyone BUT him.
 

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There are lots of really fine folks out there

http://www.brannenwoodwinds.com/ has long been considered one of the best

http://www.woodwindworkshop.com/ does excellent work

Albert Alphin is very good http://www.aawinds.com/

But-

I would suggest you check into http://www.timmoranwoodwinds.com/index.html

Tim is a fine player and does great repair work. He is not as widely known as the others on the list, but is a good guy and is easy to deal with.
Albert Alphin is close to me. Have you heard anything about him? or had him do work?
 

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Who do you guys think is the go to clarinet tech for doing a overhaul on a horn. I have an old R13 and I've never had anything done to it. It's starting to have some issues. I'm thinking if I'm going to pay to have it done I might as well go for a clarinet guy. Thanks, Steve
Why a clarinet guy. The clarinet is the easiest instrument to repair. Why not just go to your local tech. Let them repair it and see how it plays afterwards, the tech would have to be exceptionally bad to get a clarinet wrong
 

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I actually would be almost as wary of a clarinet tech with a tippy top reputation as I would one with horror stories. One never knows how much of either is hype, log-rolling, or back-scratching.

Besides, I don't play R-13s. Some of the most talked-about techs do virtually nothing else - consciously or not, that's their benchmark for a good clarinet. If you play an older clarinet (especially), they may not try very hard to make it work for you, or may just turn down the job.
 

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Why a clarinet guy. The clarinet is the easiest instrument to repair. Why not just go to your local tech. Let them repair it and see how it plays afterwards, the tech would have to be exceptionally bad to get a clarinet wrong
Not sure I agree. I had one of the above mentioned techs overhaul a horn. It was laughably bad.

Daniel Deitch in SF is good. And Ken at Best Music Company in Oakland have done a nice overhaul for me.
 

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The saxophone has subtleties, but the clarinet is all subtleties.
 

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Why a clarinet guy. The clarinet is the easiest instrument to repair. Why not just go to your local tech. Let them repair it and see how it plays afterwards, the tech would have to be exceptionally bad to get a clarinet wrong
While clarinet does not have some of the mechanism problems that an oboe may have it has lots of issues that are best dealt with by someone who knows the idiosyncrasies. Anyone can replace a pad, but REALLY getting the instrument to play well is a different story.
 

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Yeh but we are talking about someone who does it for a living, not diy'er at home. If they repair woodwind for a living and cannot get a clarinet right then something is seriously wrong, I start my apprentices of on clarinets becuase of there simplisity. My point being, if someone repairs woodwind for a living then you dont need to go to the extra trouble to find someone that just specialises in clarinets to get a good job
 

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Why a clarinet guy. The clarinet is the easiest instrument to repair. Why not just go to your local tech. Let them repair it and see how it plays afterwards, the tech would have to be exceptionally bad to get a clarinet wrong
Uhhmmm no mate, that's not even near close. Flute's the easiest to repair woodwind, I don't do flutes because I hate flutes and flutists... Anything's easy as long as you want to do it.

If the tech is a woodwind repairer, and they cannot repair a clarinet then they cant repair anything. Walk do not run, as fast as you can away from there
Again, no. I've seen more than just one "garden variety" of repairmen, producing actually good and consistent sax and flute work, make a horrible mess with clarinets.

The saxophone has subtleties, but the clarinet is all subtleties.
Yes yes yes. The only thing harder to get absolutely pristine and "right" is the oboe. You have to play clarinet to repair clarinet (and I don't mean just "play a scale", I mean be a clarinettist) and you have to play oboe (be an oboist) to fix oboes.
 

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Again, no. I've seen more than just one "garden variety" of repairmen, producing actually good and consistent sax and flute work, make a horrible mess with clarinets.
I've seen several instrument repaired by someone whose saxophone repairs are nearly always very good, his clarinet repairs had serious problems. I've seen repairs by several (supposedly) clarinet experts (including a few mentioned in this thread). One in particular was way below average and very suprising for their reputation.

Yes yes yes. The only thing harder to get absolutely pristine and "right" is the oboe. You have to play clarinet to repair clarinet (and I don't mean just "play a scale", I mean be a clarinettist) and you have to play oboe (be an oboist) to fix oboes.
I don't repair oboes and I don't know if I would say clarinet is hardest (at least for me), but I definitely agree about being able to play. In contrast to one past post I remember, some repairers are also players, some very high level professional (or non-professional) players.
For repairing, I consider that someone needs to be a high level player in terms of understanding the issues of the instrument. They don't necessarily have to play the Mozart concerto, or be a great improviser, but they need to be able to understand how the clarinet plays in many different ways to a high level (e.g. response of notes, transitions, etc.).
 

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I guess we will all agree to dis-agree.

For me the proof of a woodwind repairers hand skills and ability is there flute work. Some people just assume, you pick up a pad, screw it in and its done. Put a shim here or there and wolla, perfect. Not even close, were as a clarinet your floating a pad usually a 1/3 in size bigger than the tone hole on glue, the tone hole is a gentle taper which allows for multiple contact areas over the taper, thats as complicated as it gets to setting a pad

If your fitting a clarinet pad and floating, how many times do you have to remove and refit the key before its set exactly right, (nil),an oboe you have too at least remove the key once to reprofile the impressioned cork. A flute maybe at the least you will have to remove and refit a key 3-4 times before its right, and the pad surface for seating, is usually within 2 mm of the edge of the key cup,and contact point with the tone hole is less than 1/4mm its got to be spot on to play and stay in regulation

I agree you have to be able to play the instrument to be really able to repair them, and even not just simplistically a chromatic scale.. But I would not go so far as to say a "ist", I would find it difficult to believe that most repairers are of the calibre to be classified as an "ist" in every instrument they repair.

I know im not an "ist" not even close, but Ive repaired plenty of r13's , even nicer units like the prestiges / festivals and even tosca's
 

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Well said Simso, obviously 'modifications' come into a different category.
I'm sure the OP's (Neffs) R13 is standard, he wishes to keep it 'standard' and requires a 'standard' overhaul/re-pad, corks--the usual. Nothing to get hot under the collar about here guy's
 
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