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This is an exercise that I got from Gonz quite someyears ago. I just started doing it again faithfully and you folks may find it a good one to identify weak spots. That's what he said to me I remember it like it was yesterday .he said " Do this and you'll see REAL quick what you don't have down "

OK It starts on the top of your horn and keeps going down chromatically. 5 note groupings

First note is Bb3 .. Go up 5 notes and back down on the Lydian mode ... Bb C D E F and back down twice (don't play the F twice just once)
Next you change to Ionian mode Bb C D Eb F and back down twice ( only 1 note has changed)
Next you go Dorian mode Bb C Db Eb F twice( one note has changed)
Next is Phyrgian mode Bb B Db Eb F twice ( one more note changed )
Next is Locrian mode Bb B Db Eb E twice ( again only one note has changed)

You now change keys by dropping one note again ,the first note of the group chromatically to A

The new grouping is A B C# D# E this is the lydian mode in A twice up and down
drop the 4th to D so .... A B C# D E , you are now in the Ionian mode of A
Next Dorian A B C D E etc.........

The pattern always goes Lydian, Ionian,Dorian,Phyrgian,Locrian

Keep this pattern ALL the way down your horn through all the keys , do it with the metronome and play as clean and even as you can before accelerating speed . He demonstrated to me it was on machine gun speed.

Let me know how it goes for you.
 

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Yeah, thanks Mike! This is a good one... (I expect I'll be sobbing in the practice room...)
 

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Wow, just thinking about the modes makes my head hurt....

It's been years since I've actually had to think that much. Great suggestion! Wish I could try it out now.

Stupid work... man, these 9-5 jobs are rough...

Where's my horn when I need it?!
 

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I actually came up with the same exercise a year or two ago. Great minds think alike I guess. :D

A flute teacher of mine had given me a similar exercise. It was five notes of each mode as well but it only used ionian and locrian and it ascended instead of descended. It went:

C D E F G up and down then C Db Eb F Gb up and down and then repeated up a half step.

I wanted to expand it to cover all the possible 5 note modes and ended up with this same Bergonzi exercise.
 

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I actually came up with the same exercise a year or two ago. Great minds think alike I guess. :D

A flute teacher of mine had given me a similar exercise. It was five notes of each mode as well but it only used ionian and locrian and it ascended instead of descended. It went:

C D E F G up and down then C Db Eb F Gb up and down and then repeated up a half step.

I wanted to expand it to cover all the possible 5 note modes and ended up with this same Bergonzi exercise.
That's the 1st exercise from the Taffenel and Gaubert flute book.
 

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Once "worked out", this could be a good warm-up, ala Tafanel.

My only caveat for younger players...when practicing things like these, in the end, you end up getting REALLY good at playing the exercise, long after the benefits are gone (the brain part of figuring it out & the "fingers" benefit) It becomes more like "busy work" in the end, if you let it.
No one's gonna play this in a solo.

When you stand up to take a solo, your problems are still there (time, swinging/feel, sound, ear, ideas)
If I were giving stuff like this out to a student, I'd say, "this will make your chops feel a little better, but I wouldn't spend too much time per day on it" I think Jerry would agree.

I think, once you grasp the concept of making an exercise like this up, you can have fun making up your own, using different scales & intervals. It would be cool to try to come up with 5 or 6, then, over a year, learn them, then switch up practicing a different one, every week or day, just to keep yourself a little more on your toes.
 

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I was given a similar exercise by a teacher, except the pattern goes 1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1 7 2 7 (1), and putting the 7th in there allows you to also work in dominant and melodic minor sounds. I find it's a great finger exercise, as well as good for getting the color of each mode in your ear. It becomes much clearer when playign them from a common root, rather than around a common key center.
 
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