Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A question to the repair guys in the forum:

I had an "accident" happen to my tenor the other night... the kind that involves drunk women getting on stage, tripping over monitors and breaking their fall with saxophone necks.

The neck was pretty badly bent down but I had my tech fix it as best he could, the angle is right again, and it's playing well, but I'd like to go the extra mile and send it off when I get a chance to have it restored as best as possible, meaning the creases taken out and the hammered areas made smoother and round. I'm trying to get a bill together for the culpable party, so my question is, how much would a repair like this typically run?

Appreciate the advice.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
You need to post pics, its pretty well impossible to quote without viewing the damage.

Knocking the neck straight and roughing it out is easy enough, but when you have to try and restore it well thats a different story, you could spend an hour just on one crease mark and that one hour for me will cost you 45, so how many crease marks how many dents etc, piccy helps
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
A question to the repair guys in the forum:

I had an "accident" happen to my tenor the other night... the kind that involves drunk women getting on stage, tripping over monitors and breaking their fall with saxophone necks.

The neck was pretty badly bent down but I had my tech fix it as best he could, the angle is right again, and it's playing well, but I'd like to go the extra mile and send it off when I get a chance to have it restored as best as possible, meaning the creases taken out and the hammered areas made smoother and round. I'm trying to get a bill together for the culpable party, so my question is, how much would a repair like this typically run?

Appreciate the advice.
When you say "Hammer Areas" do you mean dents left over from not completely removing the dents and bend, or do you mean hammer area as in hammer marks left by the tool used by your tech? Hammer marks left by a steel hammer can be burnished a little to remove , but to completely make them invisibly will require combinations of filing,sanding, polishing and refinishing the neck. Also, even with pictures it is difficult to know the properties of the metal and how tough the metal is for dent removal. Getting a quote from your tech if he can do the complete job, is probably your best option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the input, guys. I'll put up pictures as soon as I can. Sorry for not doing it with the original post, and not doing it now... it's been and continues to be a busy weekend.

Basically there is a small outward ridge on either side of the neck brace - it's a mid-60's VI, so perhaps "brace" is the wrong word - that start under the highest point of the crook and run backwards perhaps 2 inches. The neck had been flattened from the bend (which was perhaps 40 degrees - yikes!) so when the tech worked in the sides, the result was a somewhat rough looking tube from just above the ring that caps the neck/body tenon, to roughly an inch before the octave pip. There are some bulges and concavities, nothing I would qualify as a dent, but definitely noticeable. I don't want perfect, and I certainly don't want sanding or burnishing - just some finesse work with a hammer or mallet, to get the taper smooth and the bore round. This tech has gone as far as he wants to with it, as the horn is playing and playing well. For the rest I'd like to use someone with a reputation for aesthetics. Coincidentally, if anyone has suggestions, I'd sure appreciate them.

kingsax - I haven't in fact lost any work because of it. The incident was friday, and I had the repair done yesterday on an emergency basis, by the best guy I knew could do it. All things considered, I'm lucky the damage was caused by someone who is taking responsibility, and even luckier that the damage was limited to the neck. Not so lucky perhaps that she hit the horn in the first place, which was accomplished from halfway across the stage... it was the closest thing to a bullseye I've seen in my life. If I could charge for emotional trauma, her next fall would involve bankruptcy.
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
... I don't want perfect, and I certainly don't want sanding or burnishing - just some finesse work with a hammer or mallet, to get the taper smooth and the bore round. This tech has gone as far as he wants to with it, as the horn is playing and playing well. For the rest I'd like to use someone with a reputation for aesthetics. Coincidentally, if anyone has suggestions, I'd sure appreciate them...
You may not want sanding, but you do want burnishing.IMHO burnishing dents out of the sax neck is a far better option than hammering down the high spots. If your tech is not experienced in dent removal he may not know how to do the repairs you need. I have many years of experience on dent removal and have posted some pictures of my work over the years. My technique for doing these kind of repairs makes minimal use of any kind of hammer. Proper use of mallets and steel dent hammers will not leave marks in the instrument. Scrapes/scratch, ping marks from hammers cannot be removed without refinishing. Dents in most cases can be removed to a very acceptable visual appeal without refinishing assuming the previous repairs did not affect the finish too badly.
 

·
Registered
JS Crescent, JS NOS, Selmer SBA, Couf Superba I, Conn, Buescher, King
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
"the kind that involves drunk women getting on stage, tripping over monitors and breaking their fall with saxophone necks."

Hey: that sounds like somebody I used to know. Or about 110,000 somebodies I used to know....

Good luck, airmouton.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top