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Hey there nice people :)
i think i might need to go up a gear and learn something new , i meant by that i got to learn altissimo and multiphonics , so if someone can explain to me what are those first and give some tips and finally something to practice with these last one :mrgreen:
 

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Don't try to do multiphonics until after you have a very firm grasp on altissimo. Many multiphonics require some extreme focus adjustments that even altissimo doesn't call for. Proficiency in playing the harmonic series off of the low fundamentals (Bb, B, C, C#, and D at least) is definitely a must. I second the Top Tones book. You may also want to give Paul Cohen's Altissimo Primer book a try just for some of the great exercises in there.

For multiphonics, the best introductory book would be Ronald Caravan's Preliminary Exercises and Etudes in Contemporary Techniques for Saxophone. Read his recommendations in the introduction and also the introductory portions of each of the 3 sections. Do the timbre change and quarter tone exercises before starting the multiphonics section. It's important to know those before doing the multiphonics because many of the multiphonics sound notes that are not in the 12 note chromatic scale (quarter tones) so it's essential to know how to play them for reference and so you can ensure you're achieving the pitches that should all be present in each multiphonic.
 

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Apologies for the double post, but it occured to me that I didn't address one of your most important questions - what are these techniques? Altissimo is our name for the extended range of the instrument (any notes that occur above palm key "F" are considered altissimo) The man who pioneered the technique, Sigurd Rascher, preferred not to call it Altissimo, but to call them "top tones," alluding his desire to make that range part of the normal playing range on the instrument rather than calling it extended. Achieving altissimo properly begins with eliciting harmonic partials from the instrument, much like a bugle player does when playing their valve'less instrument. This is done through both perfect tone imagination and proper adjustment of tongue position in the mouth to produce the harmonic series off of low fundamental notes (in our case, low Bb, B, C, C#, and D). Read Rascher's Top Tones book for more information.

Multiphonics are the simultaneous production of more than 1 pitch at a time. Many multiphonics can be produced by utilizing special fingerings while others are produced by making drastic tone production alterations to normal fingerings (the best example is when we achieve a "warbling" sound on octave G). The least commonly used type of multiphonic involves the player singing one pitch while playing another (the "growl," but with clearly defined pitches involved) With all multiphonics, while it sounds as though the pitches are sounding simultaneously, they aren't actually sounding at the same time. What is actually happening physically is that the instrument is alternating extremely rapidly between multiple pitches that it sounds near enough to simultaneous. This is why multiphonics have a natural oscillation to them. For more information, read Caravan's Preliminary Exercises and Etudes in Contemporary Techniques book.
 
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