Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, so I play 2nd alto in my hs jazz band and on the solo the chord progression is:
D7 four bars
G7 two bars
D7 one bar
B7(#9) one bar
Emi9 one bar
A7 one bar
D#7 one bar
and split D7 2 beats, A7 2 beats one bar

I'm just learning but in case I get a chance to play I know I can play D blues and D mixolydian over D7, G blues and G mixolydian over G7.
But what is B7(#9)? I also don't know what Emi9 means.
Also D#7 is just D# blues and D# mixolydian right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
It's just a blues. B7 is bringing you to the Emi9 A7 which is the ii V in D. E mi9 is E minor 9. Don't sweat it. For now just play a D blues scale and get used to improvising. Think more about rhythms for now and see what you can come up with. The most import thing when beginning to improvise is to get comfortable coming up with ideas and to try to play what ideas you are hearing in your head.

Good luck.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
3,286 Posts
True, TJ, and I agree. BUT, that last four bars will really beg for the major blues scale, rather than the minor, as they have that positive little ii-V vibe going. During the first 8 bars, move around between these two pentatonic scales:

D-F-G-A-C

and

D-E-F#-A-B

During the last 4 bars, think more about that second pentatonic.

Don't play the scale up and down -- instead, make little riffs for yourself based on those scale notes. And, since its a blues, do yourself a favor -- go check out the King Curtis disk "Night Train" right now. You'll hear everything you ever wanted to know about playing blues on that disk right there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,111 Posts
Since it's a blues, educate yourself on the blues form. By this I do NOT mean the chord changes, but the 12 bar form. Most blues songs go this way:

Goin out the door, got trouble on my mind.
Goin out the door, got trouble on my mind.
Baby up an left me, she don't treat me so kind.

Or other better lyrics to that effect.

During your solo, try to emulate this pattern of stating a them in the 1st 4 bars, restating it (maybe slightly altered) in the 2nd 4, and resolving it all in the last 4.

One other thing - no one else mentioned this, the D#7 is a substitute for A7, with other color tones. But the active tones of the chord (always the 3rd and the 7th) are the same:

A7 - C# and G
D#7 - G (F##) and C#

Good luck!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top