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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:treble: As a beginner I started with the Yamaha 4c mouthpiece for my Antigua Winds Tenor Sax. I found it difficult to work with, though I liked it on the Alto I started on. My instructor worked with me an my embouchure, all went well. I was given a chance to try mouthpieces for fun, so I did. A Rico Graphtonite B3, Brilhart 3*, Selmer C*, and a Vandoren Optimum TL3. It was a great experience. I have to say out of these my favorites where the Brilhart and the Vandoren Optimum TL3. The Rico was cheap but I finally bought the Vandoren Optimum TL3. For me it is a better fit for learning. Easy blow and control.

I now understand why those cheap mouthpieces that come with some student saxophones are such trouble. A few of my fellow students, some late bloomers like me, and others school students just starting out have replaced their cheap pieces with either the Vandoren, Selmer, or Brilhart mouthpieces. While it is fine they include a mouthpiece with the instrument, a good foundation to develop your embouchure makes it more fun to learn.

Bottom line to beginners - spend a few bucks and get a good beginner mouthpiece. It is well worth it in the long run.
 

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I'm a late bloomer and also was advised by my teacher to change out my tenor mouthpiece. I got a selmer C*. It made a huge difference to my playing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just started as a late bloomer on tenor also. For some reason I just can't play with the Yamaha 4c and I've tried two brand new ones out of the box. I squeak like crazy on it. One of them came with my new YTS-62. I bought a Hite Premiere at the local store and it solved my problem, what ever it is.
Same issue I had with the 4c. After spending time reading this forum and talking to sax players in my area, mouthpieces have to fit you. Of the 5 band players I spoke with they all said the same thing. Go and try them out, but stay away from the real cheap ones and ones that come with the sax. My instructor has helped students find and try out mouthpieces for both clarinets and saxophones. He cautions everyone to be careful not to get caught up in absolutes, but try to find the one that fits you. He said as you play and develop you will continue to find you groove, and favorite mouthpieces. (Yes, he has 2 different ones he loves, plus spares as he is a professional player as well.)
 

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Go and try them out, but stay away from the real cheap ones and ones that come with the sax. My instructor has helped students find and try out mouthpieces for both clarinets and saxophones. He cautions everyone to be careful not to get caught up in absolutes, but try to find the one that fits you. He said as you play and develop you will continue to find you groove, and favorite mouthpieces. (Yes, he has 2 different ones he loves, plus spares as he is a professional player as well.)
One caveat is to be sure not to go to far in any changes that you make. I went from a Selmer C* to a Lamberson J7 after about one year of playing (my favourite player played a J8 at the time :mrgreen:) and it just about killed me.
 
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