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Discussion Starter #1
Ok here is the deal.
I have a guy hawkins 8 metal moutpiece. Looks brand new with a Rovner lig.
However I have a hard time blowing it. Plus I have a big, fat, dumpy head (picture a pale, ghostly white shrek) and the moutpiece is too small. I think most metal ones are too small for me. I like the fatties.

I play Tenor.
I want a Large, easy to blow, great for begginers that wont break the bank.
I plan on trading in this maoutpiece for the new one.
They have like around 500 million used ones at a store near me.

Also what about Crystal? What is the purpose of those?

Ok here is a recap
1) Tenor sax
2) blues and rock mostly
3) Fat ogre like head with matching mouth
4) Metal is too small
5) easy to blow, easy to learn on and sounds good

ANY ADVICE?
Several brands would be good incase my local store does not have a specific kind

:)
dave
 

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Selmer, Rousseau, or Vandoren.

Since you are a beginner, I wouldn't go past a D facing. Give your chops some time to build up.
 

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Dittos on the Kessler OL7 Pro. I actually have and use the Kessler 50OL7 that came with my Kessler Custom Deluxe tenor. Excellent mouthpiece and as previously stated, excellent return policy. The OL7 Pro is an outstanding value for the dollar. The 50OL7 is about half the price. Neither one will break the bank. For the specific differences between the two, see Kessler's web site and then Dave a call. Excellent people to work with, straight shooters, and won't try to over sell you.
 

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I'll endorse Kessler's tenor piece (that's the one I use). BUT, I am not a tenor player even though I own one, AND mouthpiece recommendations are not worth much. Keep in mind - the material from which a mouthpiece is made makes no difference. It is the interior design and the tip-opening and the reed choice, plus the player's chops. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ok now I am confused.
I thought I was sorting this out.
the material makes no diference?
I understand that the tip opening , reed and interior makes a difference
but i thought the material did too?
Why crystal, rubber, plastic, metal, wood etc etc?
 

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Dave: Marketing is a powerful force in musical instruments and accessories. (Well, I suppose it is for all products!) If you've ever seen a catalog from Woodwind and Brasswind (WW&BW, in Indiana), your head would swim . . . many, MANY saxophones, clarinets, flutes, etc.; mouthpieces, ligatures, reeds, gadgets, all sorts of stuff. ALL designed to make you think you will be a better player when you buy any (or all) of it .

Much of it is hype, much of it IS different (like mouthpieces) to suit the individual player, OR to suit the myths and hype that surrounds musical instruments.

Some players swear by crystal, others by metal, others by the presence or absence of lacquer (on their horns, on their ligatures), others by various plating materials (on their horns, on their ligatures, on their mouthpieces) - it never ends. But few can prove that it all works (or doesn't) based solely on the marketing-hype.

I personally don't believe the myths and the hype. I've sought out what works best for me without regard to the marketing. It boils down to trial-and-error. Some of us agree on mouthpieces, horns, equipment; many others don't.

You've come to a saxophone site where most responses are opinion, some based on years of experience, but still opinion. If you doubt anything reported here, please feel free to try it yourself - and please report YOUR results. This is not offered to be offensive - just the way I see it. DAVE
 

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I'm with Dave Dolson on this one. The material is not relevant. Others think otherwise.
Trial and error really is the only way. If there is a local store with a decent selection of mouthpieces, the brands already mentioned are all good and all have fans.
I understand the size of the piece can affect comfort for you. When you go to the store, just eliminate all the ones that look too small for comfort and start your testing. You'll probably find a couple that are easy for you to play and you like the sound. Buy one and then don't read anything about mouthpieces here or anywhere else for at least 6 months. Years would be better.
 

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Hype;


  • Exaggerated or extravagant claims made especially in advertising or promotional material:

  • An advertising or promotional ploy:

  • Something deliberately misleading; a deception:
    To publicize or promote, especially by extravagant, inflated, or misleading claims:

These are some of the tools of advertisement.
Some products will be chosen for ease of manufacture, some for durability, some for their visual appeal and of course some for their "Unknown" value. A great ploy in advertisement is to make a product with a mysterious quality to add sales appeal and psychological leverage.
That way the buyer assumes the mystery material was needed to acheive the needed results, or why else use it?

As Dave has stated, try them first, don't be mesmerized by extraordinary materials as the interior chamber and facing as it relates to your chops and horn will be of the most significant value.

In fact a mere student mp could be as good to you as a $300 mp would be so even price can be part of hype.
 

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Which makes logical sence, I bought a $300 mouthpiece. (I didn't, and Wont). A lot of it has been said before. It all depends on what sound you are looking for. Hype is inportant for any bussiness. Go to the local music store and just try them out. Find one that you like, and stick with it. Dont second guess yourself on which one you buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the honesty guys
Did I mention how AWESOME this web site is?
I promise when I am more experienced I'll share my wisdom with others.

I am going to local store with hundreds of mouthpieces.
Ill try some of these out.
thanks a bunch

DAVE
 

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Well, I do think the material has somewhat of a difference, which I won't debate here, but in this regard I think we could agree somewhat. Generally the metal mpcs are smaller in the mouth than a comparitive hard rubber one and one may feel more or less comfortable with metal vs hr because of that. Also not only the size, but the feel of metal vs rubber is obvious to some, who might prefer one over the other. So in these cases, one might want to try hr and metal (not falling victim to advertising hype in the process, as pointed out above).
 

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gary said:
Generally the metal mpcs are smaller in the mouth than a comparitive hard rubber one and one may feel more or less comfortable with metal vs hr because of that. Also not only the size, but the feel of metal vs rubber is obvious to some, who might prefer one over the other.
I've not had the chance to try a metal mpc yet but it is very tempting. Especially, the taste. When I was younger I was always running around with a penney, nickel, or dime in my mouth! (Too cheap for anything more!) Tasted great and was less filling. :D Later found out I had a mineral deficiency. :dazed: Plastic and rubber just don't have the same satisfying taste. :(
 

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As a relative beginner, stay with:
* hard rubber/ plastic;
* mainstream;
* well made mouthpieces.
* medium tip opening.

From the above, go for Yanagisawa 5, Rousseau Classic or New Classic 4R or 5, Selmer S80 C* or C** (but make sure you can hit all the top and bottom notes; I think the S80 is demanding in this respect) or VanDoren (but I say this on reputation from SOTW only and don't know which model and tip opening to recommend).
 

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I have 2 of the S80 C**. One might be up for sale later. These are great mouthpieces, that fit almost any type of playing. I made the region band, and the Jazz reigon band on one. Don't ask... Long story. As a begginer you may feel happier with a C**. It blow the stock Yamaha mouthiece the school lent me out of the water.
 
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