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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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I picked up the exact horn on ebay a few years ago with the original white pads and looked to be unused. Really nice but I paid about $950 for mine. THEN I got a full pearl Virtuoso in burnished gold here on SOTW that is REALLY purty. If the one on ebay can be bought for under about $750, should be a deal. Downside is that I don't see mention of the case which can be a deal breaker. That mouthpiece is much later and may be for an alto or tenor.
 

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Good to know that we are not alone in our appreciation for C tenors....someone in the 1920s was also so enamoured as to specify such a beautiful and expensive instrument....sheer jewellery.
 

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That would make a really pretty lamp or maybe a fountain.
Correct....delightful as they are to play, this example is almost too good to place in the sweaty paws of the average sax player. :bluewink:
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member and Champion of the C-Me
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...Downside is that I don't see mention of the case which can be a deal breaker...
Bruce, with shipping to the UK quoted as "$66.45 USPS Priority Mail International", you are almost certainly right. $90-$100 is the norm including case weight for a C to the UK by Priority mail, assuming sensible packing.

Hmmm, I have a lovely empty Conn C-Mel case - I'll just keep an eye on it ! Aaahhh - just read the listing thoroughly, quote "Although there is no case...."

Grumps - I had an earlier Conn Portrait C, the previous model, straight toneholes and tenor style (no microtuner) neck. Exactly same engraving, but a bit more worn. Re-homed to another C enthusiast in the UK, yes there is more than one of us :bluewink:, it scrubbed up nicely though !
 

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I need to sell my Conn NWII C tenor, sadly. It is a near-perfect 203k in silver plate with the best overhaul you can get from Charles Gray, the sax whisperer. I am not sure how much to ask for it. I was thinking $550? That one is gorgeous, but I vastly prefer the later horns, although they are super rare.
 

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I find that the older ones with the non-rolled tone holes can be a real bugger to repad. It seems that Conn faced the always open tone holes, like the stacks, but didn't file the palm and side key (always closed) holes as well. I think their assumption was that the soft white pillow pads would squish down enough to seat. I end up having to reface these holes each time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
$550 is a great price for someone in the market for a Conn c-mel, especially one that is set up. If you are a patient type my guess is you could get $750 for it on ebay if you put it up there with say, a $750 buyitnow price and lots of pictures and good description and then patiently wait for the buyer to come along. There will be a buyer...
 

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I need to sell my Conn NWII C tenor, sadly. It is a near-perfect 203k in silver plate with the best overhaul you can get from Charles Gray, the sax whisperer. I am not sure how much to ask for it. I was thinking $550? That one is gorgeous, but I vastly prefer the later horns, although they are super rare.
Does not sound unreasonable....especially if you have fully engraved it.
 

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Those Conns (especially with the portrait nudes) were the most beautiful looking horns of the 20s. I sold a girlie alto a while back, but I hate to be critical (opinion time) but the Conn altos, tenors, sopranos, baritones, and basses were great, BUT the C melodys sound tubby vs. the tenor-like Martins or the alto-like Holtons. I'm sure this will start an argument, but as previously discussed here, many players agree with this point. I have re-built all the American C melodys and find the Conn to be somewhat dull sounding, even with a decent mouthpiece. However, the plating, build quality, and engraving put them at the top with a few others. Let Conn Hell break loose on Jazzbug!
 

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Have no fears JB; most of us here who have experience of C tenors will agree wholeheartedly with you.
There ARE differences in tonal response between ostensibly "same size" horns from the various manufacturers....probably more so in the case of the C tenors.
I have three Bb tenors from different manufacturers & of various vintages. Whilst there are perceivably differences between them, they are all unmistakably Bb tenors.
This is not the case with C tenors however.....I have owned & played Buescher, King, Conn & Martin examples. The Buescher & Kings are clearly different from their Bb & Eb siblings....a different voice, but can be coaxed to imitate either a tenor or alto dependent upon the player's preference.
The Martin C tenor however has the timbre of a Bb tenor which can be persuaded (reluctantly) to sound like a C tenor.
The Conn C tenor, by contrast, is an extended alto.
I do not know (or care) why this is so....I do not wish to get into the minutiae of bore tapers or tenon diameters....all I want is to play them.
Although I own horns in most sizes I choose to play the C tenor.....but, with a strong personal bias to the tenor style, the most tenor like C tenor......ie. the Martin....no question.
Some years ago, before I had played a Martin, I decided to make MY C tenor &, because of the good ergonomics (& despite the rolled tone holes!) I chose the Conn....although I had never played one.
Over a period of months I put a considerable amount of work into modifying the horn that I would play for the rest of my life....MY horn.
Within a matter of months it was on eBay...it was, as you say JB, an alto with some low notes....not at all what I wanted.
I understand that the Holton is even more alto-like.
I repeat....comparing the manufacturers, there are greater differences between their C tenor offerings than their tenors or altos. At least....that's my experience.
 

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Forgot to say JB1 that I agree with you that the ornately engraved & gold plated Conns of the 1920s were the most beautiful horns ever produced....especially the C tenor because of it's lovely proportions.... apart from the alto neck; if only it had a "proper" swan neck crook it would be aesthetically perfect.
 
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