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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, this is kind of a ridiculous ask, but figure I'd give the sotw community a shot at this.

Does anyone have recommendations on playing a sax while bedridden? I've had a few health episodes over the last couple of years that have landed me in a bed for longer than I'd like.

I've got a grown up fancy bed where the back comes up, too. Now I know I ain't gonna play my bari in bed. But I have a tenor and alto as well. I don't have a soprano but what with all the paid leave and time I spend looking at horns online, GAS starts to come on at times.

Could I even play a soprano while laying in bed? The bed can lean up 30 degrees or so. Or should I pick up the blues harmonica, cause it's also appropriate?

Brownie points if you can suggest something that would be least offensive to my wife, but given how I play, there's always a little bit of offense.

Thanks in advance for humoring me!
 

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I don't see why not. I have been forced to play clarinet lately because of a back injury. I prop myself up on some big pillows while leaning back on a sofa. I can only play for a short while but at least my embouchure gets a workout.

Hope you feel better soon.
 

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Soprano and harmonica sound like good ideas....acoustic guitar could be fun too...or cheap small keyboard
 

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I had a back injury a few years ago and all I could do was buzz the mouthpiece for 5 minutes a day and just finger some scales/arpeggios while lying around. My tone did improve from the Mouthpiece work and my chops didn't get as rusty. Also, when i broke my finger I read a miles autobiography and listened to every CD he made when they talked about it in the book It was a good month of learning for me K
 

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I am sure that soprano and in particular curved soprano would work.

You could alternatively try, to play silently, some electronic sax with headphones.
 

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Wind Synthesizer, Roland makes one and so does Akai. The Roland has sounds built in and is short so that might help.

Notes
 

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Soprano is the way to go.
Get better soon and listen to as much music as you can while you are out of commission for a bit.
All the best, Mark
 

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Curved sop gets my vote - or flute.

Anything that is already familiar to you may be a plus. Some portable keyboards are good to lay across the lap - proprioceptive feedback is a bonus.
 

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I’d try a flute. It’s held off to the side unlike a clarinet or soprano sax that might be a little clumsy while in a bed. Maybe a small keyboard?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow thanks for all the supportive replies! I'm awaiting surgery right now, so while I've been a bit bedridden leading up to this, I expect to continue to be bedridden after surgery. This time it isn't back issues, but I get those too.

I think I'd be most comfortable with a soprano if I had one, but one of those wind synthesizers might do the trick too! In the mean time, I might have to get someone to dig out the keyboard from the garage.

All great suggestions. A lot going on in my mind so it's great that you all could help give me some clarity and assurance that there are lots of possibilities. And the answers here were exactly what I was looking for.

Maybe I'm just in a little bit of an emotional place, but I'm really appreciative of the responses here. I'm welcome to more thoughts and advice if you've got it to give.
 

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Sorry to hear..

A straight or curved soprano should be fine. The curved sopranos (excepts for the very latest Yanis) require almost the same angle to play them, and the straight ones are much more plentiful..and cheaper.
I can't recommend a sopranino unless you want to spend all your time getting used to the intonation. Soprano intonation is hard enough, sopranino intonation is a much more time consuming battle - and I play both regularly!
 

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I really enjoy playing the penny whistle from time to time. It’d probably be a great thing to do if you’re bored and bedridden....
 

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Curved Soprano worked during my recovery after hip replacement
 

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Bending or twisting is not fun when you have a back problem. To me that rules out a flute. A curved soprano sounds like an ideal sax. A recorder or a ocarina may be another viable option. Lightweight !
 

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I've seen my son play a soprano, an alto and a tenor while laying on his back on the sofa. He'd practice for hours that way sometimes.
 

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In addition to Keith Ridenhour's excellent suggestion, you could try a blues harmonica, especially since the phrasing, timing and even solos are transferable, while helping to preserve muscle tone in lip, jaw and throat, plus giving you a challenge and resulting satisfaction. I suggest this once having played with a truly exceptional blues harp player and the two of us exchanging phrases and solos. I still play both harp and tenor.

What is important is to keep the usual daily practice/listening routine while maintaining muscle tone and fingering.

Don't know if you have any interest in the harp but while there are any number of teaching videos, I think this artist's are well structured and practical. My very best wishes for a speedy recovery! 👍😎
 
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