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Ive been tossing around the idea of becoming a repair tech for some time now, and I was wondering what you guys's opinion was on what I should major in in college, basically what you need to do to become a certified repair tech. I'm currently a sophmore in high school, so It's a ways off, but I'd like to get some info.

Thanks,
Adoeak
 

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I tend to think that there aren't too many college courses on instrument repair. I you would like to become a tech, I would get a degree in business management. It will help you run your own business, and is a great "fall-back" if you change your mind.

I would definitely find a trade school, as well, that teaches, instrument repair. I would think that learning jewelry repair, to really learn those fine solders and welds wouldn't be bad either.
 

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music education would be an excellent major. play testing an isntrument is the most important part of any complete repair, and a knowledge of a wide variety of instruments is a great start.
 

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I wanted to be a tech to, but I got my performance degree instead. However, I'm enrolled in a really great band instrument repair program right now and am really glad that I got my performance degree. I also have been playing professionally as well. The best thing I think that has helped me thus far was furthering my skills as a musician. Because of this I've been more able to observe more things and generally be more sensitive in my repair work.

You can be a good repairman without being a good player. However, the best I've encountered have been fantastic players as well as techs.

If you're looking for a very reputable school I am attending the one in Red Wing, Minnesota. It's run exactly like a shop would be run... well, slower to account for learning experience, but overall they've been very thorough with their instruction. The school is minnesota southeast technical.

Good Luck
 

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For once, I agree with hornfixer!

Do a thorough search of the forum and you will find much, much information about becoming a tech, including books to buy, tools, and plenty of advice.

Sadly, there is no such thing as "certified" when talking about repair techs. I have personally had experiences with graduates of repair school who were very, very bad at repair and also ones who were very good at repair. I have also seen a lot of very, very good technicians who never went to repair school. I have seen great techs that are not members of NAPBIRT, and I have seen bad techs that are- and I have seen the inverse of both situations as well! I think you get my drift- There are many paths to becoming a repair tech.

I personally never went to repair school, am not a member of NAPBIRT (although I keep meaning to join), and I am head woodwind technician at a large store in New York City and I have plenty of work to keep me busy.

FWIW, I was a music ed. major in college, although I didn't finish. Being able to play the many instruments I learned in my pedagogy classes has certainly helped me during my repair career.
 

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adoeak said:
Ive been tossing around the idea of becoming a repair tech for some time now, and I was wondering what you guys's opinion was on what I should major in in college, basically what you need to do to become a certified repair tech. I'm currently a sophmore in high school, so It's a ways off, but I'd like to get some info.

Thanks,
Adoeak
I believe you will find this very informative;

http://www.napbirt.org/napbirt-repair-schools.asp :D
 

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adoeak said:
Ive been tossing around the idea of becoming a repair tech for some time now.

Just some ideas.

Try and get a part time job in a repair shop to see if you like it. Learn as much as you can. Ears and eyes open and ask good questions.
Music Business degree. This is the way my Son went, and apprenticed with me at age 15. Now 25 and part owner in our shop.
Some Universities have repair Techs and Basic repair classes or summer jobs.
Then you can think about repair schools if need be.

35 years and I'm still passionate about repair and learning. I feel you should be passionate about what ever you do. Life is too short to do a job you don't love.

Carl
 
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