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What are some interesting bebop-flavored scales to play over specific parts of a blues, Blue Monk in particular?

I'm pretty new to improvising over chord changes so I've been playing the obvious things: blues scales, bebop dominant and bebop major in the appropriate bars, and diminished scale in bar six (over a IV#dim7 chord). I know about chord tones and repeating the same figure transposed up a fourth in the second four bars, or the same figure with natural 3 and flat 3 depending whether you're over the I or IV chord. What are some other, less obvious things I could play for a more interesting bebop/hard-bop sound?

Also more specifically, what are interesting patterns from the altered dominant scale or the whole-note scale that could sound good over bars 9-10?

Pointers to good bebop solos on Blue Monk also welcomed. Thanks, all!
 

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It sounds to me like you need to begin transcribing and incorporating language into your playing. It seems you have learned appropriate scales and melodic devices to get you started on playing the changes. Check out many of these books suggested and transcribe.
 

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I know about chord tones and repeating the same figure transposed up a fourth in the second four bars, or the same figure with natural 3 and flat 3 depending whether you're over the I or IV chord
Relative to what you said about the Major vs. minor 3rd - playing both types of blues scale is effective: play the Major blues scale over the I and the minor blues scale over the IV (both scales built on the I). The tendency of beginner improvisers is to kind of abuse the minor form of the blues scale - though I would be pretty certain you're not doing that. Mixing up the Major and minor blues scales, in my experience, really helps the player to internalize what is happening in the harmony of a blues form.

I'm not sure if you've gotten into tri-tone substitution yet. The blues form is a great way to learn how (and why) it works. For example, if you're playing Blue Monk in C, try playing the blues scale(s) in F# over the whole tune.
 

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This might sound flippant (it's not meant to be!), but using all those tools you describe, try to play what sounds good. From your description, I think you have more than enough tools (scales, chord tones, blue notes, blues scales, etc) at your disposal. Give a listen to what Monk and others do on that tune and see if you can identify what's happening and incorporate it in your own playing.
 

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I play trad jazz and I've found that the bebop dominant is so useful. Playing the figure root , #7 to b7 descending is one of the more colorful sounds within a mixolydian context. It's right up there with the b3 to the maj 3 and the b5 to the perfect 5th. One might write a dominant scale descending as C, B, Bb, A, G, Gb, F, E, Eb, D, C. It's a 10 note scale, but so what?
 

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