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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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Let us know how it plays.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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this instrument came yesterday. it got damaged in transit. the low c key guard bent so much that it bent the key and ripped the tone hole off. View attachment 226086 View attachment 226088 View attachment 226090
Your pics came out tiny and unreadable/unviewable. But...just from your description, IF the tonehole is damaged significantly...just initiate a return and send it back for a refund. There is no argument for seller to make and eBay will enforce the refund/return.

IF the tonehole is really still intact, just bent up/impacted, out of round but no sign of any tears or fissures to the actual metal - that IS repairable by a decent tech. Would probably run around $150...so you could conversely ask for a partial refund to cover repair.

(Now, as an aside: this may be a blessing, actually. This horn is a bit archaic, it will never have much market value because it is so old, it has a double-octave key and is keyed only up to high Eb. From the pics it certainly also looked like it needed some work to actually get playing again. So perhaps getting your $ back, and then researching a bit to develop a keener eye on what sort of things you should keep away from, will hone your purchasing skills a bit more. Nothing wrong with trying to find diamonds in the rough, but there are some obvious things one should avoid when doing so.

....best of luck).
 

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Your pics came out tiny and unreadable/unviewable. But...just from your description, IF the tonehole is damaged significantly...just initiate a return and send it back for a refund. There is no argument for seller to make and eBay will enforce the refund/return.

IF the tonehole is really still intact, just bent up/impacted, out of round but no sign of any tears or fissures to the actual metal - that IS repairable by a decent tech. Would probably run around $150...so you could conversely ask for a partial refund to cover repair.

(Now, as an aside: this may be a blessing, actually. This horn is a bit archaic, it will never have much market value because it is so old, it has a double-octave key and is keyed only up to high Eb. From the pics it certainly also looked like it needed some work to actually get playing again. So perhaps getting your $ back, and then researching a bit to develop a keener eye on what sort of things you should keep away from, will hone your purchasing skills a bit more. Nothing wrong with trying to find diamonds in the rough, but there are some obvious things one should avoid when doing so.

....best of luck).
Something really weird going on with the neck, too. Looks like someone did something with a piece of plumbing pipe.

I played in a big band with a guy who had a bari with double octave key and up to Eb. I can tell you that the very INSTANT he was able to replace it with a modern (ish) horn that thing was OUTTA there. He said that double octave key was a huge PITA.

To me, trying to make actual use of a horn like that is kind of like trying to use a Model T Ford as your daily driver for a 25 mile freeway commute. And my main saxophones range from 85 to 70 years in age.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Something really weird going on with the neck, too. Looks like someone did something with a piece of plumbing pipe.

I played in a big band with a guy who had a bari with double octave key and up to Eb. I can tell you that the very INSTANT he was able to replace it with a modern (ish) horn that thing was OUTTA there. He said that double octave key was a huge PITA.

To me, trying to make actual use of a horn like that is kind of like trying to use a Model T Ford as your daily driver for a 25 mile freeway commute. And my main saxophones range from 85 to 70 years in age.
no. actually it plays just fine... down to low D. it plays up to Eb really easily and plays perfectly down to Eb low Eb that is. and about the damage. yes, the tone hole is torn off.
 

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no. actually it plays just fine... down to low D. it plays up to Eb really easily and plays perfectly down to Eb low Eb that is. and about the damage. yes, the tone hole is torn off.
Torn off, or unsoldered? Is it a clean ‘break’ all around?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yikes, was hoping you could have it soldered back on. That kind of damage sounds catastrophic. How on Earth was it packed? That’s way more than incidental shipping damage!
there was alot of like cardboard paper stuff. kind of hard. the key guard bent to where it pressed the key down and pushed the tone hole off of where it was suppose to be. there is a dent on one side where the tone hole came off and it is jagged there. on the opposite side it is more clean. and another part where it didnt come off all the way/
 

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there was alot of like cardboard paper stuff. kind of hard. the key guard bent to where it pressed the key down and pushed the tone hole off of where it was suppose to be. there is a dent on one side where the tone hole came off and it is jagged there. on the opposite side it is more clean. and another part where it didnt come off all the way/
Sounds like little to no packing material “inside” the case which I’d critical for and horn, especially a bari! I’d initiate a return immediately as the seller did a crap packing job that caused the horn to be destroyed!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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What, you recently buy a restaurant and need stuff to hang on the walls?
(I didn't wanna laugh at this...but couldn't help myself)

there was alot of like cardboard paper stuff. kind of hard. the key guard bent to where it pressed the key down and pushed the tone hole off of where it was suppose to be. there is a dent on one side where the tone hole came off and it is jagged there. on the opposite side it is more clean. and another part where it didnt come off all the way/
OK, Brooooother. Didn't mean to seem wiseass, I know you are here for help.....so....

Can you try posting the photos again ? But make them large. If you need to, go here and enlarge those image files you probably still have stored somewhere:

https://www.imageenlarger.com/

It actually sounds, if not irreparable, then very costly to repair, as in hundreds and hundreds of dollars just for that area. But it is still hard to get a clear idea just from your written description.

I can posit solutions but they may not be germane to the actual condition there.

Regarding the horn, glad it plays. You may wanna check it to an electronic tuner. Turf is correct, that neck situation is certainly not original and although it may work, messing with the neck/upper crook of a Bari usually results in serious intonation compromises somewhere in the registers of the horn.

This still sounds like a return/refund situation....and again, it may be a fortunate circumstance for you that this got damaged and you can send it back.
 

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This still sounds like a return/refund situation....and again, it may be a fortunate circumstance for you that this got damaged and you can send it back.
Man, if I actually wanted a bari for playing, I'd be packing that little devil up and sending it back so fast it would make your head spin. Then I'd be looking for something more modern. Like, say, 1930. And maybe where someone didn't make a neck out of hardware store copper tubing.

If, on the other hand, I already had a good baritone sax to use for actually playing, and I just wanted a quaint wall hanger, or I wanted to experience what it was like to play a truly out of date instrument, I might try to put the bare minimum into getting the damaged tone hole to seal.

Basically, I think that the shipping damage offers you a lucky opportunity to dodge a bullet and move on.
 

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*sighs* i guess some people dont understand.
Yes, starting with you. When you're posting your thoughts to hundreds of players of various experience levels, many who've bought and sold vintage horns, you might just want to try learning from them rather than throwing your money away on objects. Yes. Objects. Saxophones don't have feelings. They don't feel love. And they'll never love you back. Not all are redeemable as instruments once they reach a point of diminishing usefulness.

But go right ahead and continue to learn the hard way. Buying horns you'll never be able to fully repair within a reasonable budget, or missing parts you'll need to spend a small fortune to replace. You don't have to take in the wisdom from others who may have made the same mistakes in their youth. But for those who come here to learn from others, and aren't out to place their opinions above those who have vastly greater experience... well, that's what this place is for.

So if our words are lost on you, perhaps someone else might learn from them instead.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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*sighs* i guess some people dont understand.
I know some of these comments might seem a little critical to you...but in honesty, the gist of them, and the ones in the other threads you have started regarding other horns you have purchased...is more or less the same:

While it's great fun to buy old saxes for cheap....one also, ostensibly, wants to get the most bang out of their dollar (whether they are ultimately gonna keep the instrument, gift it away, or resell it). Some of your purchases have been for stuff which most players/buyers with some experience would not touch. They may be cool, but things like archaic keywork, missing keys or necks, odd repairs, etc....those are things which a potential owner wants to stay away from.
Because all you have really done is inherit a problem which will be so costly to repair/correct/mitigate...that the cheap price of purchase has been completely neutered.

I say this from experience. Early on, I too was acquiring old or uncommon makes and models which I thought were 'rare' or 'worthwhile'. They only ended up being 'rare' in the sense that 'there weren't many around'. They were not desirable; and many a time not desirable for a decent reason. What I ended up with was a collection of horns which, even after being repaired, did not increase in either market or historical/collector value. And getting them into usable/decent shape required an investment well beyond their purchase price/value.
This is why I suggested in your thread on the neckless S20 that you take some time to research what to look for when purchasing a used sax.

People's replies here are just really pointing out that this horn, for example, has some attributes which not only make it problematic from a player perspective (ignoring the ship damage, even) but also make it undesirable from a buyer perspective.

Tech work runs at least $50/hr....significant work on an old, neglected horn is gonna be at least 7 hours; sometimes up to 30 hrs.

Buying a starter DIY sax repair 'kit' plus add'l required minimal tooling/supplies is gonna run you a good $300-400 (and you would still require a tech for dent work and bench motor stuff). That is $ well-invested, however, since most of the tools/matl's are gonna be reusable for years and years. If you wanna really 'Tool Up' for DIY, to keep tech shop trips to a minimum; you would want to budget around $1300.

Not sure what you got it for, but a Baritone with full keywork, in half-decent playing shape is gonna run at least $750. A Tenor at least $400. An alto at least $250....and these will not be 'popular' models by any means....but still decent ones.

If your price points are less that the above, what you will end up with is a horn which needs substantial work, thus negating any 'deal' you may have made.
Also, no small point: if what you are doing here is playing 'em, you are likely putting great effort into playing horns which are really not set up to play; to do that, you are likely messing with your blowing and embouchure to a degree that you are only harming yourself as a player.

It's just a matter of boning up on developing a keener eye, is all.
 
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