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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I'm a High School student with a fascination for woodwind instrument repair. I have a few questions:
- Would RooPads be good for a marching horn? I know they are naturally waterproof, but not sure how well they would hold up
- Are MusicMedic's RooPads better or are Instrument Clinic's Kangaroo Pads better?
- How do Kangaroo Pads compare to wooven, pressed, etc.?
- I have two horns (technically three, but the D. Noblet Diamond needs some body work by a professional), a Buffet B12 and a Normandy 8. Does someone know the sizes for the pads on a Normandy 8? It's my baby, nad I want to give it the best care and pads I can.

Thanks guys!

Caden Potter - AMB&G
 

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I put Black Roo pads from Music Medic in my R13 and I've been very happy with them. I had Jessica Phillips try out my clarinet as well (she is the principal clarinet plauyer of the Met) and she really liked them as well. I would wager that they would hold up longer and last longer than the traditional pads, but I haven't had mine in for a year yet so I can't say for sure. They do feel great and are a bit quieter as far as pad closing noise goes. Hope this helps.
 

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Roo pads on a marching clarinet?
First off I would NOT use the Noblet on the marching field. Use the plastic horn with standard double skin bladder pads.
They may not be 'naturally waterproof' but if your director is smart they won't have you marching in a downpour and what ever moisture they encounter will dry quickly if the case is left open for a little while.
If you want Roo's for your 'concert' horn they should be OK as long as you can get them in the proper thickness for your particular instrument, and seat them properly in the key cups.
I have played clarinets with double bladder pads throughout, cork on top/bladder on the bottom, and 'leather' pads.
Personally I prefer all bladder or cork on top/bladder on the bottom. Leather pads feel too squishy under the fingers for me.
 

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FWIW I marched or outdoor-played in every kind of weather imaginable and I still have the same set of bladder pads on my VSP. Contrary to popular belief, bladder pads withstand moisture quite well provided you properly dry your instrument afterwards. No need to mess around with more expensive material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh heavens no, the noblet is not going on the field. It's a Brass horn from the early 1910 1920 era. I use the B12 as a marching horn, but the Normandy was my first horn, and is special, as it was passed down to me by a friend of my mother, and dates to the 60's if I remember right. I just want a pad that can stand up to the weather of Indiana (ie 90-100 in summer to well below freezing in the winter.) I also was wondering if I should try to (again) repad my instrument, as the repair cost for a repad at Paige's Music is $200, and I simply don't have that kind of money...
 

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Standard pads will hold up. I've been playing clarinet 43 years. Marching band in Michigan is no different than marching band in Indiana. I've never seen a marching clarinet yet that didn't have bladder pads.
The price you quote for a repad on a student clarinet is about right. The tech does a LOT more than just put new pads on.
They clean it, oil it, straighten bent keys, adjust key heights, and replace any missing cork. This is on top of replacing all of the pads and making sure they seal properly. It's a lot of work to do a 'simple repad'.
 

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Kangaroo leather may have an exotic ring to it, and I don't know whether or not processed kangaroo leather is naturally waterproof, but I would check on just how porous it is. I have encountered some that is very porous. Porous leather constitutes leaks, and as technicians we go to so much trouble to eliminate leaks.

But then again, you may prefer the more muffled, higher resistance performance of a clarinet with leaks.
 

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If I ever find myself on a trip to New Zealand, I will be sure to bring my clarinet. However I'm poor, so I'm not sure how soon that will be.
 

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Why? I'm sure there are great technicians over most of the developed world. Ya just gotta track your local one down.
 

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Brian, Gordon didn't say that your clarinet was leaky. Just that some leather pads are too porous and ARE leaky, and he would prefer not to use them.
In his opinion, and quite a few other techs and players opinions, cork/bladder or standard double skin bladder pads throughout is the best 'tried and true' option for clarinets.
 

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I have found through testing, that pads made from kangaroo skin have advantages and dis-advantages,

I think the non stickiness claim is a misnomer,
Kangaroo pads have proved for me to be tougher and harder wearing than cow hide (leather) pads,
Kangaroo pads are more porous than leather pads but I don't feel it is significantly great enough to be noticeable when playing
Kangaroo pads give a firmer feel whilst playing
Kangaroo pads are generally less noisy

Out of pads used on a weekly basis, I would use about 60 leather pads / 5 kangaroo skin pads / 70 bladder pads

Why so little kangaroo, purely associated cost

With all the above, However I would prefer bladder pads on a clarinet, I have padded clarinets with kangaroo skinned pads and I felt it was satisfactory but a bit lacking as well
 

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Musicmedic now puts a bladder wrap under the Roopad...I wondered why that it, but possibly because of leakage? Curt claims that it is to keep the felt dry...
 

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...I have padded clarinets with kangaroo skinned pads and I felt it was satisfactory but a bit lacking as well
What was lacking? I was considering trying it out on one of my clarinets, but I have to admit, I have no issues with double bladder on the lower joint...upper joint they do have some moisture issues, especially in a cold pit.
 

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Musicmedic now puts a bladder wrap under the Roopad...I wondered why that it, but possibly because of leakage? Curt claims that it is to keep the felt dry...
It is great to keep the felt dry. Felt seems to harden at least partly from repeated deposition of the mineral salts present in saliva (and possibly carbonates from the chemical interaction of moisture, carbon dioxide, and components of brass)

However, I think that would encourage moisture to be wicked and trapped between the leather and the bladder membrane.
This moisture typically contains some saliva that is designed to begin the process of attacking organic matter, eg leather, not to mention microbes that do the same thing.

This is probably why technicians have all experienced leather on the older-type, porous-leather pads, where the leather itself has rotted or degraded to a state that it is weaker than paper. It is eventually split by the tonehole edge.
This breakdown is far, far less likely to happen if the surface of the pad stops moisture being absorbed by the leather.

Just my personal musings based on some experience; no quantified, controlled research.
 

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Roopads are great but out here in Puerto Rico due too the humidity and what not they tend to stick sometimes. I have them on my tenor keilwerth sx90 and they stick. I use padlife sometimes and usually let the horn air dry with the case open overnight.

Sent from my GT-P5210 using Tapatalk 4
 

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On a sax they are acceptable, but not for a clarinet IMO, when you look up close at the grain it has a lot of hair follicles per square cm, very tough to the touch.
 
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