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I checked the 'net, and the price looked too good to be true. Maybe I'm doing it injustice, but at roughly 2/3 of the price of a good student instrument...mmm, I don't know. After all, you get what you pay for, one way or the other.

Then again, we're seeing these cheap Chinese instruments pop up like mushrooms after a summer rain, and who knows if that one's a notch better than the others? Still, it's a bit of a gamble, and if you ever decide to part with it, the resale price is probably quite a bit lower than of a better established brand's.
 

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Boy the price is right and the thing has the Double register vent and tunable neck which are not found in any student Eb bass clarinet that i know.
I would still go with the Yamaha 221 II with a good mouthpiece.That clarinet feels sturdy.
I am wary towards the quality sturdiness of the metal used for keys and rods.
I would assume the material is pretty much the same as a Selmer Bundy which is not bad acoustically speaking a bit too 'plain' for classical IMO.
 

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I would assume the material is pretty much the same as a Selmer Bundy which is not bad acoustically speaking a bit too 'plain' for classical IMO.
I do classical exclusively on my Bundy...but I'm not in the "material matters" camp anyway. IMO, workmanship wins over material, and musicianship wins over material as well. A bass clarinet should, first and foremost, be dependable. Nothing worse than discovering it has gone out of alignment again.
 

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I checked out the link provided by tictactux and I didn't see anything about a double register vent. I'd be willing to bet that this bass does not have an automatic double register vent system.
 

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I checked out the link provided by tictactux and I didn't see anything about a double register vent. I'd be willing to bet that this bass does not have an automatic double register vent system.
A double register vent instrument usually has a pip on the neck itself, plus a 2nd vent on the body. Single octave vent instruments only have a small vent near the top of the body.
 

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did not realise they did one, but if its upt o the saxophones they have produced it may be quite good!..and for a good deal too.
 

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I would really appreciate it if one of you would kindly purchase one and then post a comprehensive review!
 

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Looking closely at the pics I think I can see a register pip on the neck. Can't see if there's another one on the body. Also the horn appears to have a left hand Eb/Ab key (can't be sure from the pics). This is something not usually found on student basses. Maybe this horn is actually worth checking out.
 

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Looking closely at the pics I think I can see a register pip on the neck. Can't see if there's another one on the body.
One of the pictures show both register vents quite well (see attachment).
View attachment 25695

Edit: And before you go all agitated about double register mechanisms - one word of caution: The more keywork you have on an instrument, the more can go out of regulation. Keeping a bass' single register vent in regulation is an an adventure of its own, but compared to a double register doohickey it's a walk in the park. I'd rather have a stable single-venter than a poorly thought-out double vent. Playing a bass with a dependable single vent mechanism is definitely more fun than an elaborate thing that needs careful handling and proper assembling (some few degrees deviation in the neck position can make a world of a difference).
 

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My experience has been that the double vent makes for a better responding clarion register. I haven't played a single vent bass that didn't have a stuffy and stubborn clarion. But this is an old argument --single vs. double vent.
 

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My experience has been that the double vent makes for a better responding clarion register. I haven't played a single vent bass that didn't have a stuffy and stubborn clarion. But this is an old argument --single vs. double vent.
Hmm. Double vent will change the "pip in charge" in mid-register (clarion f or g if I remember correct). Yes, clarion A and up can be a bit of a challenge, but with a bit of training and a good mouthpiece it isn't much of a problem. Below A - no problem at all.
 

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Actually, I think the change-over is at Eb/E. So B-Eb uses the lower of the pips, E on up the higher pip (the one on the neck). But I can't check because, sadly, I sold my beloved low C Selmer a while back to raise some much needed cash.
 

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When you are serious about the second register you need automatic double register key. There is a reason why there aren't any pro orchestra players using the single vent Leblancs.
 

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With a good Germanic name like "Bauhaus", it could only be......Chinese.

DezzaG above speaks the truth. The only symphony player I know who played a Leblanc, had Leblanc's one and only double-register-vent model (and with some custom features made just for him, too).

Just a note: many people confuse the 'double-function' throat-Bb/register vent with a double register vent (which it is not). This leads to much name-calling and finger-pointing. A true double-register-vent design will have a second bridge key leading up from a linkage operated by the r.h. ring finger key, which changes the operational vent from the lower one (on the body) to the upper one (on the neck on most instruments, but sometimes at the very top of the body if the upper joint is of extended length). If there is no second bridge key, then it is NOT a double-vent instrument.
 

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In the photos this bass clarinet seems to have the double register mechanism which includes the two keys and the long connecting linkage hinge.

I've played most of the usual models with both double reg mech (new and old Buffets, Selmers and Yamahas) and without (Vito, Bundy/Selmer, Yamaha student, etc.). IMO the double reg is not necessary for most things but for some specific things it's critical. It helps intonation of some clarion notes. It helps response of some clarion notes. But mostly, it helps response of some clarion notes in specific ways of playing them e.g. legato from some notes (which notes matter too). Of course it's more specific than that e.g. the worst clarion response of any bass clarinet I've ever played was on one with the double register vents. But I've played some things on bass clarient that IMO on a single vent model would be very difficult or even impossible to sound as cleanly.

I spoke with the people from Bauhaus Walstein and they seemed concious of issues, working with woodwind repairers and the factories to improve build and design. I'm sure it is Chinese. I think it is probably worth trying this bass clarinet. I haven't tried it though and only tried their saxophones so far.
 

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It would be nice to get a review of this horn. Seems like Bauhaus Walstein is on the right track--a student priced bass with pro model features like double vent and LH Eb/Ab key. I wonder if it has articulated G#/C# like Selmer. I'll be following this story.
 

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I'll bet the Bauhaus is identical to Ridenour's low-C bass, probably comes out of the same Chinese factory, basically a Yamaha copy in hard rubber. I got one of the early-production Ridenour basses about 5(?) years ago, didn't like the keywork, nor the tone nor the intonation, sold if after a month. Caveat emptor! Sometimes, you get what you pay for (or conversely, don't get what you don't pay for).
 

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If it sounds too good to be true it probably is. I suspect that Dave is right about this one.
 
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