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Earlier today, in his fine tribute to Earl Turbington, Tim Price said that Turbington was a master of the "bat method." Can anyone enlighten me about what this means? Playing very high notes to locate insects in the dark? Using the horn to propel round objects great distances? Seriously, I'm curious; I've not run across this term before, ancient though I may be.
 

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Funny — when I came across THIS thread I was tempted to supply an example from baseball; batters will often warm up by swinging 3 or 4 bats at a time then step up to the plate with one — sort of a "bat method" but probably unrelated. :)
 

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"Earl was very into Alvin Batiste's teachings and knew the " BAT METHOD"
very well."

Tim means Alvin BATiste's approach to music, probably life, in general. Tim would have to give you the specifics of exactly what he meant, but to answer your question generally, he means BATiste. Bat was known for his enthusiasm, openness to continue learning, and tireless efforts on behalf of jazz and it's performers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
gary said:
"Earl was very into Alvin Batiste's teachings and knew the " BAT METHOD"
very well."

Tim means Alvin BATiste's approach to music, probably life, in general. Tim would have to give you the specifics of exactly what he meant, but to answer your question generally, he means BATiste. Bat was known for his enthusiasm, openness to continue learning, and tireless efforts on behalf of jazz and it's performers.
Ah, yes, I see. Jeez, I completely missed that, but it's obvious. Thanks for clarifying, Gary.

(Whew! This means that I don't have to remake myself as a sax player because there's some terrific method out there I neglected to learn! I was looking forward to using my sax to fly through the dark and eat mosquitoes, but I guess I can live without that. On, now, to the Marsupial Method, whereby one keeps one's reeds warm in one's pouch. . . .)
 

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Believe it or not, I once actually had a bat flying around in the big studio loft I was living in and I tried to scare it away by playing my sax (no quips about my playing necessary;) ). I started with high notes and no effect. However, when I tried a big fat Bflat the thing flew right at me--scared the crap out of me actually!

Rory
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rleitch said:
Believe it or not, I once actually had a bat flying around in the big studio loft I was living in and I tried to scare it away by playing my sax (no quips about my playing necessary;) ). I started with high notes and no effect. However, when I tried a big fat Bflat the thing flew right at me--scared the crap out of me actually!

Rory
They don't like low notes. That's why bats hate whales so much.

I woke up one night -- in a great old house I was renting in Ohio -- out of a sound sleep in the pitch dark somehow KNOWING there was a bat in the room. It was flying around over the bed. If only I'd had my sax in bed with me! (No, I don't usually sleep with it: should I be? Would I get a fatter tone? No pregnancy jokes please! Bats and pregnancy don't go together!)
 

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1961 Norton Opera Hall at Chautauqua in Act 2 of Die Fledermaus, no less, several bats took flight toward the stage from the balcony where I was seated, kamikazi-ing the singers, who took evasive action in the middle of their performances - it was hilarious! Best staging trick I have ever witnessed.
 
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