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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

I recently got a Barone Hollywood 8 in a trade, and its sounding pretty good. I love the low register and the middle register on it. When I get higher, like above A2, it gets really shrill and easy to get out of tune, it feels like there is so little resistance up there, and it becomes thin and wavering. Any thoughts?

Brandon
 

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The larger tip opening on the 8 (depending on what you're used to playing) also allows tuning "flexibility" so make sure you're not tensing up at all when you start to go up the octave as that will start to play nasty games with tuning.
 

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I think you might be biting a little and have to soft of a reed. The high end of a reed starts to go on soft reeds much quicker than harder ones. Alexanders sound good but tend to go fast. They get really soft. If you mix all of that together, there you have it. Try some RJS, Vandoren ZZs, Java reds, 2 1/2 to 3s with a loose embouchure and lots of breath support with this mpc. Try playing through the whole range of your horn with out using the octave key but stay loose in your embouchure. Make it happen with full supported breath, open but intentionally shaped throat, just enough lip pressure to make a seal and focus the air with your tongue and soft pallet. Do a lot of overtones as well. A 404 selmer lig will make the mpc respond better than the two screw lig that it comes with. Good luck.
 

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with a softer setup, you have to keep your airstream control and make sure your embouchure is not biting when you play higher up the horn. Some posters mentioned it, but you're sure you're not moving your embouchure around unknowingly? Because a soft reed gives little resistance, there is the illusion that you don't need to put as much air into the horn. You still need to support the airstream from your core throughout the entire range.]

It's possible you're backing off as you go higher, because it feels like you don't need as much air.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey guys, thanks for the quick replies.

I'll try the breathing and throat stuff, but I don't really want to change reeds. I've tried pretty much every reed out there, and none is giving me the sound that I get with the Alexanders. I don't find they go that fast, but I might try a harder strength.

Brandon
 

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Jazz mouthpieces tend to be shrill and thin in the upper register. There's not much you can do, except get a classical mouthpiece. :mrgreen:
 

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Jazz mouthpieces tend to be shrill and thin in the upper register. There's not much you can do, except get a classical mouthpiece. :mrgreen:
Wow...I assume you are kidding. After all, your name is saxy251.

If not: {sarcasm on}I was going to shell out for a classical set up, but then I discovered I could get the same sound from a 99 cent pair of tube socks stuffed in the bell!{sarcasm off} :mrgreen:

Seriously though: The Hollywood is a "free blowing" mouthpiece, so you have to show discipline with your embouchure when you go up top, and going up a reed size never hurts. I like how Rigotti Gold reeds play on mine. They seem to last longer than most reeds I've tried, and they are very consistent.
 

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Show me a recording of someone using a jazz mouthpiece & soft reed, playing fortissimo, and still having a full, homogenous tone.
Who said anything about soft reeds? What's wrong with using the best reed for any particular mouthpiece?

I'm quite happy with any of my "jazz" mouthpieces getting a full tone across the range of the horn - especially at high volumes.
 

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Show me a recording of someone using a jazz mouthpiece & soft reed, playing fortissimo, and still having a full, homogenous tone.
Double Yikes.

Anyway, regardless of what mouthpiece you are using, the secret lies in the player, not the mouthpiece. Air and Embouchure control. A strength/cut of reed that is appropriate to the player's style of blowing and mouthpiece.
 

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Who said anything about soft reeds? What's wrong with using the best reed for any particular mouthpiece?

I'm quite happy with any of my "jazz" mouthpieces getting a full tone across the range of the horn - especially at high volumes.
Perhaps we have different views of what "full" and "homogenous" mean.
 

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Perhaps we have different views of what "full" and "homogenous" mean.
Perhaps we have varying interpretations of "newt".
 
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