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As you may have guessed by the title, I am looking for a altissimo fingering chart/just someone to tell me fingerings. I know a lot of people claim this is useless and never comes up in music but my band director has already asked me if we could play this chart next year that involves altissimo. So yes, it has come up in a band setting and it could definitely appear again. PLEASE do not leave any post saying how useless and pointless altissimo on bari is. Only helpful comments please!
 

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Have you googled yet?
 

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but my band director has already asked me if we could play this chart next year that involves altissimo.
Can you tell us which chart that is and which baritone altissimo notes are required in it?
 

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Can you tell us which chart that is and which baritone altissimo notes are required in it?
Yes. It may be that you only have to play one or two notes in the altissimo range (we used to call these "harmonics"). I find that about half of the altissimo fingerings carry over from tenor. The rest have to be modified or are different. You could just start with a tenor chart and if a note doesn't sound right, try lifting or adding a finger.
 

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Looks like it goes up to Bb4, so you have to learn 4 notes. Do you have a high F# key on the bari you are using? (A modern bari should). If so, then I find that tenor altissimo fingerings generally are the same as bari's. Google altissimo charts and play around with the fingerings a bit and you should get there. Also, your teacher should know. Good luck and have fun - great chart!
 

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The Chart is Moanin' by Charles Mingus. If you don't know the chart all too well here is a link that can show the bari part on it:
http://www.tringali.org/music/moanin.pdf
I'd suggest maybe picking up a lick here and there, but basically making up your own solo. That's what improv should be all about. Unless you're familiar with altissimo already, you're not going to be able to pick it up in time to learn this piece. It can take years upon years to get to the level to play this piece note for note, and most will never get it no matter how much work they put in.
 

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I'd suggest maybe picking up a lick here and there, but basically making up your own solo. That's what improv should be all about. Unless you're familiar with altissimo already, you're not going to be able to pick it up in time to learn this piece. It can take years upon years to get to the level to play this piece note for note, and most will never get it no matter how much work they put in.
I was going to say something similar.

Asking anyone to play a transcribed solo with altissimo is out of order IMO. As a composer an arranger I would never ever ever write a chart that insisted on a player (especially baritone) playing altissimo, unless I knew the player I was writing for and they were happy with it. It's just plain bad arranging.

I sometimes direct pro recording sessions with top session players, if I turned u with that I can guarantee they would look at me as if I'm an idiot. It would be like writing high Gs or super C for all the trumpets, or a bass part that goes below the bottom string of the bass.

Yes, it's OK to present a transcribed solo like that with an instruction that it is optional, but for an arranger, or conductor to insist on that is just plain wrong.

OTOH, if you think you can play it then, good luck my hat is off to you. I certainly wouldn't attempt it, I'd play my own solo.
 

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I need to make an altissimo fingering chart for bari that goes so high we won't have to listen to it.
Try the good old Top Tones:
 

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The Chart is Moanin' by Charles Mingus. If you don't know the chart all too well here is a link that can show the bari part on it:
http://www.tringali.org/music/moanin.pdf
There is -NO- altissimo called for in the baritone part in the published chart of Moanin.' You're looking at the solo transcribed from one of Cuber's recordings of it, which includes a cadenza at the beginning. The transcription also doesn't go to the end of that recording. Very little of what you see in that transcription (only what's approximated in bars 14-25) will be in your part when you actually get the chart.
 

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Rousseau's excellent Saxophone High Tones, 2nd Ed., has outstanding exercises to develop control of the harmonic series, a chart that is specific to each saxophone with multiple options for each note, and great technical exercises to integrate that with the standard register. Most importantly, the baritone overblows a M6, not a m6, so, for example, where palm D can also overblow an altissimo B on alto or tenor, it will produce a Bb on baritone, so the fingering set is quite different.

As for Moanin', you don't need any altissimo for the bari part, unless you are also performing Ronnie Cuber's solo note-for-note.
 

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I have attached a copy of Ronnie Cuber's altissimo fingerings. They work for me. Thanks to Tim Price for this.
 

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Makes sense--Ronnie is using overblown m6 for A through C (fingering C# through E-natural), with some fingers added in the front (oxx/xxo) for stability or pitch correction on his horn.
 

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The Ronnie Cuber fingerings above were published in a Sax Journal interview. Ronnie said he made them up himself to be easy to get around on his horn (Selmer VI?). Looking at the transcribed solo, you can see where his fingerings help. Like the fork F3-G3 licks.

On my sax (mouthpiece and embouchure), his G3 fingering does not respond well for me. But I could use it with a little practice. Often you need to use less-than-ideal altissimo fingerings to play certain licks.

I learned altissimo using the Rascher Top Tones book. The exercises and concepts are great. But the fingerings generally will not work on low A baris. Especially on the notes just above F3. For bari, I would recommend the altissimo book by Dr. Bob Luckey. He has alternative fingerings for SATB saxes you can try out for response and intonation. He even marks them how flat/sharp they are in relation to each other so you can try a fingering to correct a problem you may have. Your embouchure can correct a lot but if you need to vary it a lot from note to note for intonation, that is not the best strategy.
 

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Your band director wants a kid who cant play in altissimo to play a Ronnie Cuber solo note for note? er.....
 

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Okay, I find Altissimo on Bari to be pretty hard.. And Moanin doesn't require it. I performed this last year in my high school big band, took a bit from Ronnie's solo (Actually, just the turnaround). You need to have a FAT low sound, and lungs of steel, altissimo isn't really required... I went up to G3. Plus, it is absolutely ridiculous for a high schooler to pull off his transcribed solo outside of the introductory cadenza. My advice would be to improv.
 

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