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Discussion Starter #1
I'm primarily a bass guitar player and play in an acoustic-ish rock/pop trio.
I used to play bari in HS and recently picked up an old King (in the shop for some repair work) and thought I might just adapt my bass parts and play the sax instead at the gigs.

Anyone do this? Play a Bari to cover the bass parts?
 

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Yes. It's not that easy, since you can't go as low with a bari as you do with a bass guitar. This means that part of the "bass lines" are coming very close to the rest.

But personally, I'm really a fan of bassing on a bari. I often double the bass lines on bari in one of my bands.

Best way to know : try it out. You'll hear when it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think the most "challenging" part will be the songs where the bass line is three and a half minutes of eights-on-the-root.
 

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I play bari most of the time in our church's Praise Team. The bass player has not shown a few times lately, so I've played the part. I think it works better if the bass is there and I double him where I have to 'blend in', then come out on some walking improv notes to enhance the low end. I think playing the bass part alone with the rest of the band just doesn't sound as full (...Captain Obvious). ;-)
 

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I tried this once at a big wedding gig in the country when the bass player got lost and was an hour late showing up. Really tough. The bari, even amplified, doesn't fill up a big room the way a bass does. We got through it OK, and the wedding crowd didn't seem to notice the difference (go figger), but it was hard work! I was glad to see the bass player, even though we fired him a month later (for other reasons).
 

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It's interesting. I've done bass lines in combos when our bass player wasn't around. Then, the only issue is playing good bass lines on the fly. It sounds just as good if you've got a decent time feel.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
All the bass parts are under my fingers and instinctive at this point. On the bass, that is.

I'd need to transpose them, of course, and learn them on the bari. I figure it will do two things. It will be an interesting novelty that will go over well with our audiences (we have a strange following like that) and it will "throw me in the water" to develop some "improv, jam, just play something" chops on the sax which I never never never developed yet. If it wasn't written on a staff, I couldn't play it on a sax.
 

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Decades back in soul bands, I used to play bari as much with the bass lines as with the other horns. I remember also experimenting with an octave splitter on the bari (after I saw/heard Wilton Felder using one on his tenor).

Adding that extra 'electronic' octave under the bari's acoustic sound made for interesting effects, as well as confusing the bass player :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ha, great. I have an octave pedal. That would be interesting. I hadn't thought of that.
 

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If you use a mic to drive the pedal, you might need a small pre-amp to bring the level up high enough to properly work with a pedal. I get best results with (e.g.) a AKG bell mic with its own booster/mixer/phantom, then plugged into effects. Depends on the mic's output.

Slightly more civilised than the old method of drilling the neck, or a mouthpiece, for a pickup.
 

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Rowka said:
All the bass parts are under my fingers and instinctive at this point. On the bass, that is.

I'd need to transpose them, of course, and learn them on the bari. I figure it will do two things. It will be an interesting novelty that will go over well with our audiences (we have a strange following like that) and it will "throw me in the water" to develop some "improv, jam, just play something" chops on the sax which I never never never developed yet. If it wasn't written on a staff, I couldn't play it on a sax.
If you have written parts, all you need to do is read the bass clef parts as though they were Eb in treble clef. You might have to do some weird enharmonic transpositions, but it's pretty straightforward otherwise.
 

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Brendan Muse said:
If you have written parts, all you need to do is read the bass clef parts as though they were Eb in treble clef. You might have to do some weird enharmonic transpositions, but it's pretty straightforward otherwise.
Don't forget to change the key signature and any changes, also!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Brendan Muse said:
If you have written parts, all you need to do is read the bass clef parts as though they were Eb in treble clef. You might have to do some weird enharmonic transpositions, but it's pretty straightforward otherwise.
That's funny. Written parts for acoustic pop/rock.

At best I have hand written chord charts that I scribbled to help me quickly learn 50 songs by ear in 2 weeks.
 

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Well, write five or six parts out, then, just so you can get yourself used to transposing in your head.
 

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It's possible to transpose 'in the head' or purely by ear, with no written content !

Once you have written parts, then you need music stands, then you need lamps, then you need somewhere to plug the lamps in, then someone trips over all the extra cables, then the stands all go down like dominoes, and then you have to sort the music out in front of a very bemused audience.......:(

Far better to 'busk it' - if you have to have music then use it just for learning the numbers. :thumbrig: (unless of course you play hundreds of different numbers, or have constantly changing 'deps')
 

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Yes, sorry Rowka, that comment wasn't aimed at you......

I think we both approach music with a similar attitude ;)
 

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cmelodysax said:
It's possible to transpose 'in the head' or purely by ear, with no written content !
I know that. :p I just meant as a way of working out and internalizing the transposition- purely an exercise. I wouldn't recommend that he start lugging a book with all the charts to every gig. That's just silly.
 

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Agreed, although some gigs (weddings, funerals...) I've done required that a big box of fake/busker books was conveniently close for unexpected 'requests'....

All I was trying to say is that the world is full of sax players who handle C-Eb instrument translation 'on the fly' - it's a very useful skill to have (e.g. doubling bari/flute...) - and I'd be surprised if a lot of those players went to the trouble of sitting down with manuscript paper.

(Now I'll expect a deluge of "Oh yes we did....." :( )
 
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