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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Been playing baritone (YBS-52 w/stock 5C mp, ZZ 3's) for a few months now in a classical setting, and having problems with D2 and E2 jumping the harmonic when going over/jumping back and forth across the break. Bari not being my first horn, I'm wondering if this is typical of the baritone, or if it's more likely a leak problem? My breath support is good, and embouchure is correct, ie. loose enough that the horn speaks freely with good intonation and control in all registers.

Hoping bari specialists can chime in with some advice, tips to work on, etc., as this is beginning to get frustrating. Thanks in advance.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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Hmmm... You mean C2 to D2? There's no real break between D2 and E2. If you're breaking notes between those 2 there's probably a serious issue with the horn.

If it's C2 to D2, yeah, that can cause some issues, as D2 usually wants to move to A (2nd harmonic) if you're too tight on the embouchure. I know this sound counter intuitive, but if you work on softer reed for awhile to get yourself to loosen up a bit then it helps.

Generally, I have to drop the jaw slightly to get D2 to speak with certainty crossing the break, but also, generally, I loosen up a lot on bari from my other horns and use softer reeds than I would on tenor or alto.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hmmm... You mean C2 to D2? There's no real break between D2 and E2. If you're breaking notes between those 2 there's probably a serious issue with the horn.

If it's C2 to D2, yeah, that can cause some issues, as D2 usually wants to move to A (2nd harmonic) if you're too tight on the embouchure. I know this sound counter intuitive, but if you work on softer reed for awhile to get yourself to loosen up a bit then it helps.

Generally, I have to drop the jaw slightly to get D2 to speak with certainty crossing the break, but also, generally, I loosen up a lot on bari from my other horns and use softer reeds than I would on tenor or alto.
Yes, I meant the C2-D2 break, although the jump occurs on both D2, E2 and sometimes even F2. Thanks for the advice - I'll try the softer reeds (I think I may have some 2.5's around here somewhere).
 

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Über Geek, Forum Contributor 2010 Distinguished SO
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Have you had the horn looked at lately? Leaks might cause instability around there, as well as pitch problems.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I don't think this issue is any more prevalent on baritone than the other horns, although it's possible that it's easier for a leak to develop on the larger instruments, which most of the time doesn't notice apart from in a few specific cases (as in this one).

As you only getb the problem with baritone, I would think it's the horn rather than you, but just in case I'll copy an answer I gave to a similar problem in another thread, which seemed to solve a similar issue:

This is a common problem. First thing to check is that there are no leaks, so get your horn looked at by a good technician as a leak in many places (often undetectable with a leak light) can cause this.

Although it can be embouchure, it can also be caused by slightly sloppy fingering, ie closing the D or rest of the RH stack a split second before closing the G (LH3). Ideally they should go down simultaneously, but the best way i have found to counteract this is initially to consciously close the G just slightly before the RH stack. Think "left hand, right hand" sooner or later they will be simultaneous, this is just a method to work on to get over the problem.

It's a case of the way your conscious mind connects the dots until it becomes subconscious.

But it could still be an embouchure issue, harder to diagnose and deal with over the internet, see a teacher.
 
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