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There are days where I try to shed and my tone is thin, can't hit any of my overtone exercises, no reed swaps work, etc. Then I cycle through my mpcs and without fail, I find one that 'just works', and I can continue without the pain squeaks, thing tone, etc. I play that piece for the day, then try my main piece the next shed session, and I'm eventually back to it. Does anyone else experience this?
 

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I used to.....

But then I realised that the chopping and changing of mouthpieces was the cause of me having problems.

Listening to the advice of others, I stopped doing that.
I picked the one I liked best ( it was a Meyer 5 ), put the others in a box and gave to my parents, who lived 100s of miles away.

I had no option but to only play the Meyer.

It was much to my advantage.

I know it’s great fun chopping and changing gear etc, etc, but in terms of development, it is not a great idea.
 

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I've never really had more than 2 mouthpieces at a time. But usually only one. I tend to agree with KMR's advice.

Sometimes if I haven't played for 3 or 4 days I will notice some fatigue. But I just work through it. Overtones only tend to suffer for me when reeds are right at the end of their life. I haven't had any troubles with reeds in the past couple of years so every time I've slapped one on recently I feel like I can play pretty confidently.
 

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There are days where I try to shed and my tone is thin, can't hit any of my overtone exercises, no reed swaps work, etc. Then I cycle through my mpcs and without fail, I find one that 'just works', and I can continue without the pain squeaks, thing tone, etc. I play that piece for the day, then try my main piece the next shed session, and I'm eventually back to it. Does anyone else experience this?
Possibly other people who keep chopping and changing mouthpieces, which doesn't really give their embouchure a chance to settle down. Sorry, I don't wish that to sound admonishing, but I honestly believe it's best to stick with a mouthpiece through thick and thin.

If you think about it there is no logical reason for that too happen - in other words it isn't the mouthpiece's fault!

Just stick with the mouthpiece and persevere with tone control exercises.
 

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Agree, it's not the mouthpiece's fault. It's something about you, physically. I know I make a lot of golf comparisons but... bear with me. Some days I go to practice and nearly every ball is cleanly hit and goes where I intended. Other days I spray balls all over the place. The physical coordination just isn't there. I feel the same thing happening when I practice. Some days the embouchure isn't there. Some days it is but the fingers won't do what I want. We're made of flesh and blood. We can't expect to perform like a machine. I try to practice a little longer on the good days, enjoying it while it lasts. On the bad days I try to put in an honest session, but keeping it short.
 

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Possibly other people who keep chopping and changing mouthpieces, which doesn't really give their embouchure a chance to settle down.
+1. This is exactly the problem (ask me how I know...:)). Unless you have a couple of mpcs of similar design, tip size, facing, etc, there is always a period of adjustment when switching, and cycling through several mpcs will only mess you up as you are constantly changing from one to the next. Best to find one you like and then stick with it exclusively, at least for a reasonable period of time, several months or more.
 

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Agree, it's not the mouthpiece's fault. It's something about you, physically. I know I make a lot of golf comparisons but... bear with me. Some days I go to practice and nearly every ball is cleanly hit and goes where I intended. Other days I spray balls all over the place.
OK, so to carry your golf analogy to this context, do you switch to a different bag of clubs to compensate for whatever is not working?

We're made of flesh and blood. We can't expect to perform like a machine. I try to practice a little longer on the good days, enjoying it while it lasts. On the bad days I try to put in an honest session, but keeping it short.
So what do you do if you have a performance that day? If you examine this premise, it would statically imply that for a given big band, someone should just not show up that day - a band would NEVER have a full section playing at peak performance. And yet they do.

Hmmm, there must be something of merit in working through a bad day with what you have. Don’t keep swapping mouthpieces and rotating through favorite excuses. Make it work. Make it work well.
 
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