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Discussion Starter #1
Is there something about the neck bore size of BA altos that makes it more susceptible to the "spitty", "sizzling bacon" sound I get when saliva collects inside the mouthpiece?

It's as if the saliva cannot drain out.

I've tried many different mouthpieces and the only one that doesn't do this is my Vandoren V16 A8M which has a fairly large chamber.
I play tested the Ted Klum Acoustimax and it is also free of it, but I haven't played it long enough to tell if shows up later.

Anyone else have this problem with their BA?
Any solutions?
 

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Maybe you're just a 'wet' player!
Out of curiosity... Do you get the same spitty sound when you play other brand/makes of horns?
Until you get the issue figured out I would suggest that you lean more forward while playing, or point the tip of the mouthpiece to the ceiling between pieces to help the saliva/condensation drain out of the mouthpiece and neck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe you're just a 'wet' player!
Out of curiosity... Do you get the same spitty sound when you play other brand/makes of horns?....
I don't think I produce more saliva than average, when I swab out my instruments they're not excessively wet, there's no puddle in the bow like some players get.

I don't have this problem with my SBA tenor.
 

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I've often heard the 'frying bacon' sound when players are using a metal mouthpiece with a tip opening that's too wide for them and a reed that's too hard.
 

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Maybe you're just a 'wet' player!
Out of curiosity... Do you get the same spitty sound when you play other brand/makes of horns?
Until you get the issue figured out I would suggest that you lean more forward while playing, or point the tip of the mouthpiece to the ceiling between pieces to help the saliva/condensation drain out of the mouthpiece and neck.
And Suck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't play metal mouthpieces.
As for reed strength; I can understand if it were chirping, but it's not.

The saliva/condensation seems to collect inside the mouthpiece and is not drained out.

Could the height of the mouthpiece floor be a factor?
 

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Does your neck cork fit tightly? Is the sound coming from the corners of your mouth? Is the sound coming from the "break" on the facing as air and spit escape out the side of the back measurement on the facing curve? If that is the case you are either playing too hard a reed for your embouchure or your facing is messed up.

Try a different reed on the same mouthpiece and ligature. Try a different ligature with the same reed and mouthpiece. Try a different mouthpiece on the horn. Change variables one by one to see when the sizzling goes away.

I have never heard anyone say that a Balanced Action alto saxophone will cause a spit sizzle sound. The issue is something besides the horn's design.
 

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Do you suck sometimes? :)
Meaning... do you occasionally suck whatever is in the mouthpiece back to your mouth, so any saliva or water in there are not there to create that "noise" (which BTW, is sometimes used on purpose)?
If not, try it.
 

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I'm happy to say my Balanced Action alto doesn't sizzle but it has a sweet, sweet sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Does your neck cork fit tightly? Is the sound coming from the corners of your mouth? Is the sound coming from the "break" on the facing as air and spit escape out the side of the back measurement on the facing curve? .
The neck cork is tight enough. The sound is only coming from inside the mouthpiece. The facing is OK, the reed seals properly (it passes the "pop" test).
As I said, on some mouthpieces that sound isn't there and all of them are in the .080/.085 tip opening range played with Vandoren traditional #3 reeds.
.
Try a different mouthpiece on the horn. Change variables one by one to see when the sizzling goes away...
I'm thinking it's a mouthpiece issue. I was curious to see if the BA is pickier in that area.

I have never heard anyone say that a Balanced Action alto saxophone will cause a spit sizzle sound. The issue is something besides the horn's design.
OK, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
.... do you occasionally suck whatever is in the mouthpiece back to your mouth, so any saliva or water in there are not there to create that "noise"....
Yes I do. I will also shake out the moisture from the neck or mouthpiece and the sound will go away but only temporarily.
 

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What mouthpiece are you using?
My BA is a very early one (22,XXX).
My alto also is an early one-similar serial #. I'm using a Richie Cole model made by Bari, #5. I've also used a Berg 100/1, a large chambered Dukoff (D7 L), a Runyon Smoothbore, a Runyon Custom and a Claude Lakey 5*3 with none of the the symptoms you've described.
The Bari Richie Cole is my favorite.
 

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Why don't you try the old "cork grease in the chamber" trick on the offending piece and see if that makes a difference. Just a light coating may help.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My alto also is an early one-similar serial #. I'm using a Richie Cole model made by Bari, #5. I've also used a Berg 100/1, a large chambered Dukoff (D7 L), a Runyon Smoothbore, a Runyon Custom and a Claude Lakey 5*3 with none of the the symptoms you've described.
The Bari Richie Cole is my favorite.

OK, thanks.
I'm a bit perplexed as to why I'm having this problem when you haven't encountered this with so many varied mouthpieces :scratch:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Why don't you try the old "cork grease in the chamber" trick on the offending piece and see if that makes a difference. Just a light coating may help.
I have tried that in the past with another mouthpiece, I can't remember if it helped or not, I'll give another shot.
It was a bit messy to deal with...
 

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i would say your issue is air support... you are not moving the air fast enough or for what ever reason you are just collecting spit on the reed, you can either try sucking the spit back when it starts to happen or fool around with more air.... it is not the saxophone... or the neck... it is you... figure it out.

if you try a different alto and you don't have that problem it is because of how you are moving the air in that alto.

i worked through this issue in college many years ago, and was also primarily a tenor player where i did not have this issue. you might also try a softer reed.

outside of making sure that the horn is set up well and leak free, dont' waste your money on adjsuting the horn or buying a different alto.
 
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