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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I'm beginner to play Sax tenor. I'm considering two saxes to buy due to their reasonable prices which I can get.

1. B&S blue label.
2. Buescher true tone low pitch 1925s.

Which one is better in your opinion and why?
Thanks a lot.
 

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two incredibly different horns and in my opinion not to be compared,

The Buescher is very old with very much less user friendly ergonomics (especially to a beginner) made prior to the introduction of the front F and with button G# ( so, worth very much less than a model from 1928 onwards with front F and G# with halfmoon and roller).

B&S modern horn, spending some money to update the pads will be a good idea. Modern sound and intonation.

They are both horns with merits
 

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I have owned a B&S Blue Label tenor and currently own a Buescher Aristocrat series 1. The Buescher is not a 'True Tone' as such, but shares many features.

I agree with @milandro - the Buescher will probably be less friendly for the beginner. It's possible the TT will have a beautiful tone and tune well, but it will likely be mouthpiece picky and will probably have more than a few quirks. I guess you could argue that people in 1925 still somehow found a way to learn to play the saxophone, but modern instruments are just more forgiving.

Having said that, I would only consider a Blue Label if it's been properly overhauled/serivced. The original pads and contact materials were truly dreadful. All horns are improved through proper overhauls and servicing, but with a Blue Label, it's akin to finishing the construction of the horn. My Blue Label had a few quirks that were rectified in the overhaul: very sharp-edged LH spatula keys that gouged my fingers, the low C# mechanism had to be dremeled away to allow the key to open properly and play with good intonation, the G key had to be set to open high enough to bump into the keywork above. It ended up being an expensive job, but then again, my horn had had a very rough life. All these quirks were worth it, though, because the end result has a great tone and a very accurate scale. The instrument served me reliably on tour and through a year of uni study.

As for my Buescher, it's a top quality item and easily holds its own against any tenor I've played. It's not a TT, but it has the heritage!

Either way, try before you buy, if you can! Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
two incredibly different horns and in my opinion not to be compared,

The Buescher is very old with very much less user friendly ergonomics (especially to a beginner) made prior to the introduction of the front F and with button G# ( so, worth very much less than a model from 1928 onwards with front F and G# with halfmoon and roller).

B&S modern horn, spending some money to update the pads will be a good idea. Modern sound and intonation.

They are both horns with merits
Thanks for reply!

Yes, absolutely different horns.
I just have no ability to test it side by side. But even if I would have I'm not sure I'm good enough to make right decision.

Is ergonomic much better on b&s? How about tune and tone?
 

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Ergonomics should be better on the B&S. Tuning too, probably. Tone - both are good choices.
 

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Thing is, the TT Tenors, the split-bell key ones pre-Aristocrat....they are only "OK" horns. For whatever reason, and this does happen thru history, sometimes a mfr's model hits the nail on the head in ONE voice or another, but NOT across all voices. This is the case with TT's.

The Altos are fantastic, arguably the best Altos of their period ever made. But the Tenors don't quite have that same thing going for them. They are ...OK...but if I were getting a 20's split-bell Tenor, I would get a Conn, King, Holton, Martin before I'd get a Buescher.

The B&S is a very good horn. I would go for that one.

Remember now...as a beginner....you need to get an assurance from the seller(s) that the sax is in GOOD PLAYING CONDITION.
This means it plays up and down the registers easily, properly.
If the sellers are NOT willing to guarantee this, and by this I mean they will take the horn back and return your money if it arrives to you NOT in good playing condition....then either walk away...or offer at least $200usd equivalent LESS than what they are asking.
OR tell them: "I will buy it at your price if you get it checked and serviced and provide me with a copy of the servicing receipt/contract".

You do not want to buy a sax which needs servicing work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for responses.
Before I thought buescher is better option. Your comments are very valuable.
 

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Good Luck, have someone else testing the saxophones, if you are a beginner.
 

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The Altos are fantastic, arguably the best Altos of their period ever made. But the Tenors don't quite have that same thing going for them. They are ...OK鈥

Thanks for your opinion. This is very good information to have.
 

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I have two True Tone tenors; one made in 1925(194,xxx) and one in 1929(253,xxx) .

the one made in '25 does have a front F but indeed has the button G# - also has the salt
shaker neck 8va vent . Anyway I think they're both strong players, but I can see why
a lot of people would pass them up, which is cool. A lot of people don't want to deal
with the more coveted 10Ms and Super 20s in favor of say a Mark VI .

Out of sheer curiosity I pursued the True Tone tenor because no one seemed to be
looking for these .. a little too far back in the weeds for most looking at vintage American
tenors - - same deal with the Martins of this general period, I suspect.

Well.. they sound great but maybe not a first choice tenor for the majority of players
and especially a beginner . Maybe grab a Yamaha in that situation .
 

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If you are starting out on the tenor, the B and S may be the best choice. Well built horns, nice ergos. As a vintage horn fan, I think the Buescher may provide a more complex tone, but at the expense of coming to grips with quite primitive keywork. Both good horns, very different.
 

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I have owned a B&S Blue Label tenor and currently own a Buescher Aristocrat series 1. The Buescher is not a 'True Tone' as such, but shares many features.

I agree with @milandro - the Buescher will probably be less friendly for the beginner. It's possible the TT will have a beautiful tone and tune well, but it will likely be mouthpiece picky and will probably have more than a few quirks. I guess you could argue that people in 1925 still somehow found a way to learn to play the saxophone, but modern instruments are just more forgiving.

Having said that, I would only consider a Blue Label if it's been properly overhauled/serivced. The original pads and contact materials were truly dreadful. All horns are improved through proper overhauls and servicing, but with a Blue Label, it's akin to finishing the construction of the horn. My Blue Label had a few quirks that were rectified in the overhaul: very sharp-edged LH spatula keys that gouged my fingers, the low C# mechanism had to be dremeled away to allow the key to open properly and play with good intonation, the G key had to be set to open high enough to bump into the keywork above. It ended up being an expensive job, but then again, my horn had had a very rough life. All these quirks were worth it, though, because the end result has a great tone and a very accurate scale. The instrument served me reliably on tour and through a year of uni study.

As for my Buescher, it's a top quality item and easily holds its own against any tenor I've played. It's not a TT, but it has the heritage!

Either way, try before you buy, if you can! Good luck
The TT 1925 tenors sound real good. Lots to push against with a huge dynamic range. Intonation on the TT's is not that accurate, a lot of chop adjustments needed while blowing. Having said that they are worth the work. Got to say i think they are real hard to beat regarding the tone that can be created.
 

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I have two True Tone tenors; one made in 1925(194,xxx) and one in 1929(253,xxx) .

the one made in '25 does have a front F but indeed has the button G# - also has the salt
shaker neck 8va vent . Anyway I think they're both strong players, but I can see why
a lot of people would pass them up, which is cool. A lot of people don't want to deal
with the more coveted 10Ms and Super 20s in favor of say a Mark VI .

Out of sheer curiosity I pursued the True Tone tenor because no one seemed to be
looking for these .. a little too far back in the weeds for most looking at vintage American
tenors - - same deal with the Martins of this general period, I suspect.

Well.. they sound great but maybe not a first choice tenor for the majority of players
and especially a beginner . Maybe grab a Yamaha in that situation .
Totally agree, any good student yamaha tenor, overhauled if old, is great to play and learn on.
 
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