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Discussion Starter #1
I'm used to lipping down my c#'s on alto, that's been a "given" in my journey. But after having my alto's octave floater key fixed, I find that I now have to lip up my B and B flat. (Re: the octave key, it was falling off periodically because the part itself is stripped of threads--being vintage '36, part not replaceable, so my tech had to wedge it in.) I'm curious to know whether the octave key might previously not have been opening enough, so I developed a habit of lipping up the B and B flats, or whether it's only now out of whack intonation-wise when it wasn't before. Another thing I notice after the repair is that when I play middle D after being in the high register, I have to adjust my embouchure into the middle register more, or it gives me a multiphonic with the high overtone.

Funny thing is, my new-to-me tenor has the same B, B flat issue. I can learn to lip it up, but if I should just get something on the sax adjusted, I'd rather do that.

Anyone have time to offer opinions?
 

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I'm used to lipping down my c#'s on alto, that's been a "given" in my journey. But after having my alto's octave floater key fixed, I find that I now have to lip up my B and B flat. (Re: the octave key, it was falling off periodically because the part itself is stripped of threads--being vintage '36, part not replaceable, so my tech had to wedge it in.) I'm curious to know whether the octave key might previously not have been opening enough, so I developed a habit of lipping up the B and B flats, or whether it's only now out of whack intonation-wise when it wasn't before. Another thing I notice after the repair is that when I play middle D after being in the high register, I have to adjust my embouchure into the middle register more, or it gives me a multiphonic with the high overtone.

Funny thing is, my new-to-me tenor has the same B, B flat issue. I can learn to lip it up, but if I should just get something on the sax adjusted, I'd rather do that.

Anyone have time to offer opinions?
Off the top of my head I would suspect you need to push in and play with a lower basic pitch. If the MP is too far out, the short tube notes will be relatively flatter than the longer tube notes.

On the other hand, if your repair person is unable to make a permanent repair to a part with stripped threads because "a replacement part is not available", they may also have fouled up the key heights on these pads. (That wouldn't explain having the similar issue on tenor, but playing with a habitually too tight embouchure could.)
 

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I'm trying to understand your post. Do you mean C#3 when you talk about lipping down? That is not uncommon because C#3 tends to be a sharp note on most saxes. The B and Bb not so much. According to Gary Scavone's thesis, the neck octave vent is in the ideal position for the note B which means that the octave between B2 and B3 should not be affected by the opening of the octave key. What note do you tune to on alto? Is it the same on tenor?

I totally don't get what you mean by the "octave floater key" and your tech having to "wedge it in". Perhaps a photo might help to clarify those terms. One thing I can share is that if someone plays too high on the mouthpiece input pitch, it forces the mouthpiece to be pulled farther off the cork to bring the sax down to A=440. Changing the length of the saxophone by moving the mouthpiece in or out has a greater effect upon the "short tube notes" because the change in distance is a larger percentage of those note's wavelengths. [Turf3 said basically the same thing while I was typing. Great minds must think alike. :)]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
On my mouthpiece alone, on tenor I get concert G, on alto, concert G#. View attachment 226366 The attached pic shows the octave key that had been messing up. the rod was falling out, and when it did, the key would begin to fall off. I had to push it back in several times in one gig. The rod is wedged in now so it won't fall.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Off the top of my head I would suspect you need to push in and play with a lower basic pitch. If the MP is too far out, the short tube notes will be relatively flatter than the longer tube notes.

On the other hand, if your repair person is unable to make a permanent repair to a part with stripped threads because "a replacement part is not available", they may also have fouled up the key heights on these pads. (That wouldn't explain having the similar issue on tenor, but playing with a habitually too tight embouchure could.)
+1 to both points. Specifically regarding the repair person, repairing a stripped thread is not an uncommon repair, and any reasonably competent tech should be able to do that for not too much money.

Regarding the flat B’s, this sounds like a combination breath support and embouchure issue to me. Quick check on intonation - play B2 (middle line B, LH index finger, no octave key). Then “slur” to the same note, but finger low B. That is, overblow low B so it sounds the same as B2. If the standard B2 is flat compared to the B1 overblown, then turf3’s comment is right on the money. Put your mouthpiece where you can switch between overblown B1 and B2 with no pitch change, then learn to play in tune with the mouthpiece in that position.
 

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Those key heights on your tenor look wicked high to me. Also you need to get the side keys straightened out, they're bent all over the place.

If the key heights are all over the place and often too high because your repair person is a knucklehead, that will mess with intonation, and it'll do it in somewhat unpredictable ways (because the positions of tone holes are based on a certain key opening and some notes are vented with only one tone hole, others with two three or more).
 
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