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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone own this method? What did you get for your money? What grain sandpaper does he use? (I've tried some of his ideas with 600 wet/dry sandpaper and so far the results are satisfactory) Thanks is advance.
 

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I own it, have for several years, still use it today :) He recommends 320 and 400 grit sandpaper, no-load variety (this means that the paper is coated with stearate). That's what the sanding block comes with. 600 is a bit fine for reeds, IMO.

Was it worth the money? You bet. The DVD is excellent, the booklet a little less excellent but still good as a somewhat stiffly-written treatise. Valuable information in both. But, the system has actually cost me money (and a little time), as it inspired me to buy a few other reed-working books - the one by Ray Reed, Larry Guy's monograph, and a treatise by some clarinetist in the Midwest somewhere. None of those are nearly as good as the ATG booklet. The section on reeds in Larry Teal's The Art of Saxophone Playing is better than those other books, mostly because it's short and to the point, but still misses the mark.

I was taught, as all the books except Ridenour's recommend, to break in reeds. There was a period in my life when I was gigging a lot (6 or 7 nights a week, doubling on soprano-alto-tenor sax, clarinet, flute, alto flute, piccolo, and a little oboe/E.H.). Occasionally I would find that I had to get reeds ready for the gig without the break-in procedure, and I eventually noticed that those reeds played just as well as the ones that I carefully broke in, so I stopped doing it.

I think it's just a historical custom kind of thing. Ridenour is against it. I know of no one who has done a study of the benefits of a break-in period vs. not doing it. Me, I don't need a study, as the several thousand reeds I've consumed in my life is enough...
 

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Same here. I also have the Reed Geek and am still getting used to it. It takes me more time to get any results with it. One advantage of the Reed Geek is that you can put it in you pocket so you can use it anywhere.
 

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I don't think that the reed tool (Geek, ATG, knife, reed rush) is the magic, but having a system on what to do, where to adjust is the real key. Tom has a guided approach which works pretty well. There are other books and articles as well that can be helpful. Having a grip on some basic ideas can be a great place to start.

https://www.eddiesclarinet.com/eddiesclarinet.com/Reeds_files/Reed Diagram IMG_0004.pdf

FWIW- I generally use a reed knife. I briefly had a reed geek and found that I kept reaching for the knife to do things easier and faster. I know people love them, but it was not the answer for me. Find what works for you and go with it.
 

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I use the ATG system. I previously used other methods and waffled about purchasing the system. I have had it now for two or more years and still use it so I guess that says something. I find it quick and easy to use. Not as handy to carry around as a knife.
 

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I've used it for years; The instructions are clear, its hard to screw up or damage a reed with ATG, the tools provided work (I think the block design helps to prevent buggering up the reed to some extent while sanding), and most importantly, it works to save and improve reeds that would otherwise be binned.

What you are paying for is the method rather than the materials. Its an investment in intellectual property that will more than pay for itself.
 

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I don't think that the reed tool (Geek, ATG, knife, reed rush) is the magic, but having a system on what to do, where to adjust is the real key. Tom has a guided approach which works pretty well. <snip>
Wise words. I really like Tom's approach - let the reed tell you what the reed needs done.

In all my cases there is a small glass plaque (one of these I bought more than 50 years ago...), about 1x3 inches and some 320 grit sandpaper. Using these tools you can accomplish the same tasks as with the ATG sanding block, though they are easier with the block.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In all my cases there is a small glass plaque (one of these I bought more than 50 years ago...), about 1x3 inches and some 320 grit sandpaper. Using these tools you can accomplish the same tasks as with the ATG sanding block, though they are easier with the block.[/QUOTE

I cut a 3X3" square of sandpaper and wrap it around a computer slip drive (it doesn't hurt the drive). Then I walk up to a window pane and use this for the sanding surface (It doesn't seem to scratch the window). This works fine.
 

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I have the ATG materials and the reedgeek and I use both, reedgeek to flatten the back and touch up the reed, the atg to balance harder reeds. I watched SwinginNice’s recent vlog interview tutorial on the reedgeek and found the info really useful about adjusting the top corners of the reed . I know much of that info is pretty standard for anyone adept with a reed knife but i hadn’t really spent the time learning as much fine adjustment. I also purchased the pack of micro polishing cloths from Michael Lowenstern (bs cl guy), and I find those super useful for more fine tuning of a reed. I feel like I can make more subtle adjustments to the reed using the cloths. I like the atg,but I don’t always like starting with a reed a half strength harder as I don’t have as much time to do larger quantities of sanding.
 

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I have the ATG materials and the reedgeek and I use both, reedgeek to flatten the back and touch up the reed, the atg to balance harder reeds.
That sounds like a reasonable approach. I use the reedgeek to flatten the back of the reed and it works great for that. But on the top surface, for some reason fine sandpaper (with the reed held against a flat smooth surface) seems to work better for me, probably because I haven't mastered the use of a blade on the top of the reed; those fine adjustments seem easier with sandpaper.
 

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I’ve got this all packed into an sd card storage pouch along with a glass Vandoren reed resurfacing plate I’ve also had for a while. It’s a lifesaving little kit, I can tweak reeds on the go in different locations to keep reeds playing on my more finicky mpcs (Rpc’s)
 

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I have the ATG materials and the reedgeek and I use both, reedgeek to flatten the back and touch up the reed, the atg to balance harder reeds. I watched SwinginNice’s recent vlog interview tutorial on the reedgeek and found the info really useful about adjusting the top corners of the reed . I know much of that info is pretty standard for anyone adept with a reed knife but i hadn’t really spent the time learning as much fine adjustment. I also purchased the pack of micro polishing cloths from Michael Lowenstern (bs cl guy), and I find those super useful for more fine tuning of a reed. I feel like I can make more subtle adjustments to the reed using the cloths. I like the atg,but I don’t always like starting with a reed a half strength harder as I don’t have as much time to do larger quantities of sanding.
Ving,
Couldn't agree more. I have both and use the ReedGeek for fine tuning. SwinginNice's (Jay) recent ReedGeek video was very insightful and had some great info, including taking cane off the spine, which I don't think the ATG system addresses. Both these systems make reed adjustments a snap and with a little practice, a mediocre reed can be made playable in just a few minutes.

I also play the bagpipes and learned to adjust reeds by using a pocket knife. My 80 year old instructor would whip out his knife and whittle away for a few seconds and then hand me back a perfectly balanced reed. Took me awhile to learn his technique and never fully mastered it. But with ATG and the ReedGeek, reed work is much more enjoyable.
 

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I thought the video was a joke. If I'd have paid the regular price for it ($75 I think at the time?) I'd have felt swindled for sure. it's glass, sandpaper, a block and a rubber band with a creepy weird video. Why would people want to take material off the tip of the reed anyway? To each their own.
 

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I thought the video was a joke. If I'd have paid the regular price for it ($75 I think at the time?) I'd have felt swindled for sure. it's glass, sandpaper, a block and a rubber band with a creepy weird video. Why would people want to take material off the tip of the reed anyway? To each their own.
Well, I find his method is pretty useful actually, and although, yes, it takes material off the tip, I would offer that the philosophy is to start with a half strength harder and balance both sides of the reed as well as the tip thus ending up with a more accurate reed cut. The video is a little low budget perhaps , and the visual of using the blindfold is odd but I don’t think ill-intentioned.
 

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I thought the video was a joke. If I'd have paid the regular price for it ($75 I think at the time?) I'd have felt swindled for sure. it's glass, sandpaper, a block and a rubber band with a creepy weird video. Why would people want to take material off the tip of the reed anyway? To each their own.
I tend to agree with you. The materials themselves aren't worth more than a few dollars and when I watched the video many years ago I didn't feel it taught me much I hadn't already been shown by my teachers years before. Of course not everyone has access to good private lesson instruction so for some it seems more revolutionary than it really is. I give him credit for taking the time in codifying and documenting the whole process to some extent and going through the trouble to produce and package the whole thing. As for the cost, closing in on $90 now, I'd find that very hard to justify unless I was teaching woodwinds and could share it among a large group of students. Though, I admit, I'm a bit of a retro-grouch when it comes to most of this stuff; Reedgeek (yes I own one), Klangbogen, LeFreque, Key Leaves, gold plated thumb rests, and all sorts of other doo-dads and new-and-improved sax related products; whether they work or not they're all grossly overpriced IMO.
 

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I thought the video was a joke. If I'd have paid the regular price for it ($75 I think at the time?) I'd have felt swindled for sure. it's glass, sandpaper, a block and a rubber band with a creepy weird video. Why would people want to take material off the tip of the reed anyway? To each their own.
Where else would you take material? The spine? The heart? The back of the vamp? The tip is where the action is man...
 
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