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Discussion Starter #1
What would be the closest ”copy” to a MkVI neck in your opinion? Besides a MkVI neck of course:)
Not asking about improved versions or such, just the nearest thing there is regarding sound and feel, expensive or chinese copys, does not matter.
Ive tried SeriesIII, ref necks, KB Redwood, Glogger but all these lack the ”MkVI-something”
Any suggestions?
Cheers
 

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well, dimension wise, Gloger made and makes and exact replica.

If you don’t find it having the “ something” in a custom exact replica how do you think that a Chinese copy which is not seeking exactly replicate anything is going to go?

There is every likelihood that this will be a fool’s errand ( I am not saying that you are a fool).

Anyway, there are early Selmer copies which, at the time, the ’70, were a very close replica of SBA and Mark VI to the point that parts could be used to replace original parts.

Brands were Parrot, Swallow, Lark , maybe you can get hold of one of these.

 

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I have two Series III necks that I can interchange between my 186 (1971) MK VI and my Selmer USA tenors - Sterling and brass. I also have the original neck for the VI which I recently had looked at by KB in NY. He did some minor corrections that had built up over the years. Although the neck is better than it was, it can't hold a candle to either one of the III necks. The Sterling neck particularly is exquisite but the brass one simply reminds me of a new MK VI.
The core of the question is what serial number range is the VI in and what was the neck configuration at that time? I compared the shape of my VI neck, a late Paris VI replacement neck and both III necks by tracing their outlines and overlaying - they were all the same. But if you have an earlier VI, the neck will be different from these. The fact that Selmer made these changes on the VI tenor necks throughout the run at least until about 1969 tells me that they were constantly striving for improvement and identifying areas where the previous saxes had shortcomings. IOW, I see the late necks as the ultimate version for the VI tenor. It certainly has worked out for me that way. As long as the III necks are being made in all the different materials and finishes, I have no anxiety about possibly needing a neck and having to pay huge amounts to get one. Plus, if my horn is ever sold, the original neck will be there for it. To the VI player, this abundance of III neck choices should be like strolling in neck wonderland!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input!:)
To clarify, I'm not on the hunt for a MkVI replica neck, I'm happy playing my horn as it is. I was only asking out of curiosity if anybody knew of a aftermarket neck with MkVI feel
and sound (but maybe this doesn't exist).
Besides my main horn, I have a VI from mid 60ies and sometimes I just try the neck for fun on my main horn and, to me, it has a clearer core, more resistance but also a smooth velvety quality, I think you know what I'm trying to describe. The SeriesIII neck has more grit and brightens up more when I push it than the VI. Not necessarily a bad thing though and I play the SIII mainly.

Like I said, was just curious if someone knew of one.

Cheers!
 

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Ive been through this search and although the high end necks I’ve owned and tried sounded great (some better) than my stock neck, none played/felt like a vintage vi neck. I think that’s just how it is; not to say a modern neck can’t be superior acoustically. Like the KB necks. I just think they are different, and for me the answer was eventually just a different vintage vi neck.
 

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Thanks for the input!:)
To clarify, I'm not on the hunt for a MkVI replica neck, I'm happy playing my horn as it is. I was only asking out of curiosity if anybody knew of a aftermarket neck with MkVI feel
and sound (but maybe this doesn't exist).
Besides my main horn, I have a VI from mid 60ies and sometimes I just try the neck for fun on my main horn and, to me, it has a clearer core, more resistance but also a smooth velvety quality, I think you know what I'm trying to describe. The SeriesIII neck has more grit and brightens up more when I push it than the VI. Not necessarily a bad thing though and I play the SIII mainly.

Like I said, was just curious if someone knew of one.

Cheers!
Same here, mid-60s MVI, original neck, and a SIII neck that is brighter. I'm mainly playing in a rock band presently, the SIII really cuts better. The most obvious difference, is the higher curvature in the SIII, where the MVI neck is flatter. Might be a correlation, might not.
 

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I could see using a modern neck for rock situations or, maybe classical. For everything else I’d prefer the character of the vi necks.
 

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I could see using a modern neck for rock situations or, maybe classical. For everything else I’d prefer the character of the vi necks.
Only two genres left: country and western.

I still have a new Serie II neck I used on a Mark VI that I sold. Couldn't tell much difference when using it, but maybe I have a tin ear.
 

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I could see using a modern neck for rock situations or, maybe classical. For everything else I’d prefer the character of the vi necks.
Rock, classical, and jazz were the genres most popularly played on Selmer Mk VI tenors.
 

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Pop, rock....

whatever that means...:whistle:

The Mark VI was intended to be (as all Selmer always were) an instrument for classical music , developed by and for classical musicians,... but then they were used ALSO ( and not only) for something different



 

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My point was that a modern neck cuts through better in a loud environment on my selmer, and in a classical situation I found improved intonation and response to be an asset with a modern neck. However, for me I felt even with those improvements I preferred the tone and flexibility of my original neck in jazz settings. Of course, you can play any style on any neck or horn.
 

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'The most obvious difference, is the higher curvature in the SIII, where the MVI neck is flatter. Might be a correlation, might not.'

This is only correct where you are comparing the III neck to an early VI. With the early '60s and later VI, the III is identical, as I have already stated.

The III neck is made in various materials so you may have to try different ones. In my case, the Sterling silver neck is what I needed, or should I say what the horns needed. Selmer also makes a Ref 54 neck for those desiring the early Selmer 'flatter' neck, in addition to the Ref 36. Either of those can also be Sterling silver
 

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'The most obvious difference, is the higher curvature in the SIII, where the MVI neck is flatter. Might be a correlation, might not.'

This is only correct where you are comparing the III neck to an early VI. With the early '60s and later VI, the III is identical, as I have already stated.

The III neck is made in various materials so you may have to try different ones. In my case, the Sterling silver neck is what I needed, or should I say what the horns needed. Selmer also makes a Ref 54 neck for those desiring the early Selmer 'flatter' neck, in addition to the Ref 36. Either of those can also be Sterling silver
Is this tenor or alto? as I have a Selmer sterling neck for my alto Millennium however it tunes slightly differently to my mid 60s MVI neck.

I also have been told the dimensions are slightly different.

Andrew
 

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I dont know, but cant help but think that there was a pretty wide spread in the performance of Mark VI necks across a 20+ year production period, so getting "Close to a mkVI neck" is probably very dependent on what specific characteristics of which particular mkVI you have in mind?

So many saxes out there are said to be based on the geometry of the VI, its probably harder to find one that doesnt have something in common with a VI?
 

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I dont know, but cant help but think that there was a pretty wide spread in the performance of Mark VI necks across a 20+ year production period, so getting "Close to a mkVI neck" is probably very dependent on what specific characteristics of which particular mkVI you have in mind?

So many saxes out there are said to be based on the geometry of the VI, its probably harder to find one that doesnt have something in common with a VI?


I agree, in my experience there is quite a difference between later necks and earlier ones; both in performance and physical shape.
 

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Am I correct in saying the necks were matched up by the specific horns. Mine has the serial scratched under the rocker switch.

Unfortunately some clown fell on over on a DJs PA last week, my sax was at the back against the curtain as I was taking a break. The speaker fell onto my neck :( Without a doubt the best horn I have ever owned intonation/balance/sound perfect for me..........ah well it's at the docs.

I have a sterling silver selmer neck, but intonation was a little sketchy. obviously body had a little movement so that could be the reason.

Andrew
 

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Am I correct in saying the necks were matched up by the specific horns. Mine has the serial scratched under the rocker switch.

Andrew
Yes, you are correct. For most of the Mk VI run, the necks were matched up in the Elkhart Factory and in the Selmer Paris factory. Results vary greatly, though.

Metallurgy definitely matters here, I think. You can have all of the correct dimensions of a VI neck and still not get the frequencies right. Literally, it's illegal to make a neck with the same mix and a VI in most countries.

Each neck will play with a different character. However, with the right tech who knows how to voice a neck, you can make a lot of neck match up to your horn.
 

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This is a question about altos, right?
 
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