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I have a couple metal and hard rubber Link tenor mouthpieces that are basically around a few years old. They play and sound great. I bought them because I saw players I look up to, and want to 'sound' like, using them way back then. Rollins, Coltrane, Gordon, to name a few. As well as Joshua Redmen nowadays (to be honest, I have no idea what Redmen plays, but I bet he's used one at least once on a recording).
The SOUND those guys got is what draws me to them. Am I missing something (besides $$$) by not checking out those old vintage Link's?
 

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I would say that for the rubber links, yes. I have two slant signature tenor pieces. They play way different than the modern non-slant links. Now, Otto Link has some new pieces out that might maybe change the trend, but I haven't tried them.
 

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I just picked up a New Vintage (HR) Link and it does give me the sound (60's Trane) I was looking for. The key for me was finding the the right reed. All the links that I have are reed sensitive.

At least now I can stop my search and focus on trying to play what's in my head.
 

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Just a thought... kinda gratuitous advice...PLAY MUSIC!
You sound good right,you like your sound...so...Play Music!!!
You could make mouthpieces your hobby,there are numerous forum mouthpiece nitwits who have,or else you could{this is thinking outside the snare I know}put your self into music.
I have numerous slants,Florida stms,ny Meyer and Meyer bro pieces,they are great pieces and they are different from the current pieces yes...BUT you don't need one of those to sound beautiful and play expressively.
I fear a little the effect of the mouthpiece dealers on SOTW and ebay,the mouthpiece capitalists who have inflated both the prices and the fantasy of these idealised objects .Don't buy into it.{through a courtesy towards the mouthpiece dealers on SOTW who in my experience are decent folk and reputable business people,the contrary voice which is highly scathing of their effect as mouthpiece capitalists,inflating vintage prices and fantasies for profit, is perhaps muted!}
Play music instead!NOW hehe
No need to be a genius psychoanalyst to see my critique is also a confession.
 

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I have told the story before, but I had an original vintage NY Tonemaster which I loved. I bought one of the new Vintage Style Tonemasters as a backup and it was OK, but nowhere near the original. I sent it to Warburtun and Eric made it better than the original. (No financial interest; just a satisfied customer) I still believe that the way a mouthpiece feels, is more important than the sound. If it makes you WANT to play, the sound will come from you.
 

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If you ar satisfied with what you got now, then don't bother with thinking about the rest. Later, you may decide to check soemthign else out. No harm in that. But if the mouthpiece you have now gets you from a-b and is not slowing you down then just do the work and practice.

Good luck.
 

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"I have a couple metal and hard rubber Link tenor mouthpieces that are basically around a few years old. They play and sound great."

What more do you want? If you are getting you own sound and you like it don't get caught up on the mouthpiece merry-go-round. When you gain more experience and want a "certain" sound you can then pick a mouthpiece that has the basic qualities that you are striving for, send it to a good refacer and articulate what you want them to accomplish for you.

JR

My personal view on your basic question, with 50 some years of performing behind me and my experience "some" of the newer Links can be as as good or as bad and the vintage ones. I do agree with that the current Links can be inconsistent in their quality, or lack there of BUT there are allot of Link "vintage" dogs out there too. Just because it's vintage does not mean it's going to be a great mouthpiece.
 

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Just a thought on the original post- Isn't the deal with older pieces that there's a sort of natural selection going on- the real dogs are in the trash, the semi decent ones have been reworked and the good ones have been cherished down the ages. Hence older pieces seem better...
 

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In a word, no. I never found that a vintage metal Link played any better than newer ones. Try a few old Tone Masters and you will see quickly what I am talking about. I've had ones that were worked by name re-facers that were still dead. Hard rubber is a different animal because they can get real "tubby" sounding real easy. Not too many guys play hard rubber Links anyway. There are better choices.
 

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Just a thought on the original post- Isn't the deal with older pieces that there's a sort of natural selection going on- the real dogs are in the trash, the semi decent ones have been reworked and the good ones have been cherished down the ages. Hence older pieces seem better...
That's not been my experience. In the last couple decades I've had many young people at seminars (and just regular players) bring me a "vintage" Otto Link (metal and HR) that they purchased, some at very high prices, saying "I can't get this piece to play or somethings not right, etc." I always try to help unless I'm in some strict time table. Within a few minutes of playing their piece it's obvious it's a crappy mouthpiece that needs to go of to a refacer. Sure there are some good ones out there and those are the ones that seldom go up for sale somewhere. I do see a preponderance in numbers of OLs that just keep getting recycled by some stores and sellers...ask yourself why!
 
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