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Just out of curiosity- are the Selmer Series II horns the most popular horns being played by classical sax players? Followed by Yamaha Custom series horns, maybe?
I havent seen Keilwerths or Yanis mentiond too often on CD liner notes.
What say you all? :)
 

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That's my understanding.

Although I believe given enough time, I would think that you'll see a lot more Serie III's listed as well. They just haven't been around nearly long as the Serie II.
 

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I would say that Selmer Series II's are indeed the most popular. Just an opinion given what I've seen though. I've played them and they are very nice horns and they are well constructed.

That said, I've seen alot of people play on other horns. Series 3's and Series 1's are also popular. Or at least the Series 1's were in there day. One of the local college prof's, John Sampen, plays on one and sounds amazing. Also, my friend plays on a Custom EX and was first chair in Michigan All-State last year, not that it means anything, but it does go to show that even if the Series 2's are the most popular there are many other fine (and more affordable) options out there.

Anyway, to cut through my gibberish that I realize I just wrote I'd say the Series 2's are the most popular followed by either the Yamaha Customs or Series 3's.
 

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Do that many people really play on Series III's? I'm surprised since I've heard so many negative comments about those horns and the poor quality control that Selmer has on them. I tended to assume that most people play on Yamahas. Don't forget about all those vintage horn junkies out there too! Lots of saxophonists love their VI's and Bueschers (but not as many as probably like their Yamahas).
 

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DWoz5000 said:
Do that many people really play on Series III's? I'm surprised since I've heard so many negative comments about those horns and the poor quality control that Selmer has on them.
The current Serie II and Serie III are made at the same place. I doubt the IIIs are any more of less quality than the IIs...and my II is great.
 

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DWoz5000 said:
I've heard so many negative comments about those horns and the poor quality control that Selmer has on them.
Hearing the same comments from 5 people 20 times does not make 100 negative comments. ;)

It's amazing how web lore can grow. If Selmer were truly that bad, they would lose their WORLD market share very fast. I don't care about the Selmer hyperbole that some will claim rules the day. If their horns were garbage, their dealers could not command the prices that they do. Resale also remains high for new Selmers.

For all the love that J-K owners profess, the resale for J-K horns has plummeted.

Best to try the horns that interest you and make your own call. I've played Serie II altos and know several others with them - great horns. I could understand if the II is preferred over the III because of ergos or tone but that's about it.
 

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Grumps said:
How about VII's in the classical world? Are they as panned there as well?

Steven Mauk plays one doesn't he?
 

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Dr G said:
Hearing the same comments from 5 people 20 times does not make 100 negative comments. ;)

It's amazing how web lore can grow. If Selmer were truly that bad, they would lose their WORLD market share very fast. I don't care about the Selmer hyperbole that some will claim rules the day. If their horns were garbage, their dealers could not command the prices that they do. Resale also remains high for new Selmers.

For all the love that J-K owners profess, the resale for J-K horns has plummeted.

Best to try the horns that interest you and make your own call. I've played Serie II altos and know several others with them - great horns. I could understand if the II is preferred over the III because of ergos or tone but that's about it.
I've heard that they are alot less consistent in quality than Series II's. Not to say they are bad horns by any means (would I play on one if they were?) but they are picky. I must say that they are horns that Series II's are probably more dependably better, as in the horns are more consistent.

Both are however great horns and it really depends on what you like yourself. Playtest everything. One person may hate a horn while another loves the same one. It's about personality and individuality.

EDIT: I heard a rumor from my teacher awhile ago that they were going to discontinue the Series 3's? Anyone know if this is true or not? I'm going to guess not since most of the rumors he tells me he hears never come true but you never know maybe there is that one lucky snowball that made it through hell ;)
 

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I play on a series 3 and love it. I was told (this may not be correct) that there were slight problems with some of the first release (with the vent key) but this has been sorted out. A friend and I both purchased ours when they first came out in Australia and we had to have the vent fixed by a tech (just a stupid bit of cork had a tendency to fall off), the series 3 now don't have that stupid bit of cork, problem solved. In France I have seen heaps of teachers and students playing on a series 3, quite often with a silver neck. They really are quite popular at the moment. In terms of quality control, I had the pleasure last year of helping a friend pick a series 3 tenor from selmer in paris. We tried 20 horns and nineteen were excellent. There are good and bad saxes of all makes and variety really, but I find that you can play some amazing saxes that are series 2, series 3, mark 6, yanagisawa, yamaha. Find one you like, don't worry about the brand. However, if selmer sponsored me I'd definately say that there is no better sax than selmer.
In terms of mark7, Arno Bornkamp plays a m7 tenor, and so do some of his students. Arno doesn't sound too bad on tenor either.
 

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In Holland the most used Selmer for classical, well in fact for any style of music, is Mark VI. There is a tendency towards more modern saxes for ergonomic reasons, but a fine m6 is still most wanted. I have never seen a Mark VI replaced by a series II, though. I know some people that replaced their m6 soprano for a serie III. And a lot of series II and III alto's are being replaced by references.
My own expierence, I play a serie II, is that I never came accross a nice serie III myself. I just never liked the sound of them. But I also would never buy my own sax again and I have a very, very nice serie II, because when I find the right Reference, it will have all the qualities of my own sax AND will have a much richer sound, especially in higher notes, and will still be able to sparkle. The sound of the II's I have played, is always thinner compared to the References. It is a long search before I will have found what Iam looking for but there are a lot of II's and a lot of Ref's. so Iam confidend that I will find one.
But for pref. of selmers in Holland I would say: M6, Ref.,III, II (or II, III)
 

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IME, the Super Action 80 II, especially Alto Sax, is quite capable of blending with strings, flutes, clarinets, trumpets, horns, trombones, etc at every dynamic level. The Saxophone was once considered too "jazzy" and loud for the classical style unless specifically called for my the composer.

I have had the pleasure of playing with solo violin in public and not blowing out the violin, but instead blending with it. The violinist really enjoyed it and told me it was the sound that compelled him to stop by. His main gig was, at the time, strolling violinist at an upscale restaurant. Not very often do I get to play with strings. :cool:
 

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DXCamp said:
IME, the Super Action 80 II, especially Alto Sax, is quite capable of blending with strings, flutes, clarinets, trumpets, horns, trombones, etc at every dynamic level. The Saxophone was once considered too "jazzy" and loud for the classical style unless specifically called for my the composer.

I have had the pleasure of playing with solo violin in public and not blowing out the violin, but instead blending with it. The violinist really enjoyed it and told me it was the sound that compelled him to stop by. His main gig was, at the time, strolling violinist at an upscale restaurant. Not very often do I get to play with strings. :cool:
I think that it depends mostly on the specific sax you are playing rather than the series and it depends on your skills.
Furthermore I think that-in a duet situation- not every combination is alucky one. EG Iwould never play alt with flute, but with clarinet I would certainly. And a tenor and a flute...beautifull. Never soprano and clarinet, but soprano and organ. Never thought of alto and violin though, I am curious about it. Some time ago I was at a performance of a soprano and an altoviolin, that was superb!
 

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Never have heard of Altoviolin (are you referring to Viola?) and don't know for sure if the SA 80 II is the choice for folks who perform classical material. My favorite style is Baroque and violin is a contemporary instrument of that period. The Violin has also been featured in Jazz music. I use, and prefer, a hard rubber mpc with my Series II. The Series II is a well engineered piece of hardware, IMHO.
 

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murphy235 said:
I've heard that they are alot less consistent in quality than Series II's. Not to say they are bad horns by any means (would I play on one if they were?) but they are picky. I must say that they are horns that Series II's are probably more dependably better, as in the horns are more consistent.

Both are however great horns and it really depends on what you like yourself. Playtest everything. One person may hate a horn while another loves the same one. It's about personality and individuality.

Yeah, Yeah, Yeah. This has been the case for years with Selmers, no? I bought my first Mark VI, a tenor, new over thirty years ago. And the word then was, " try a lot of 'em...there are a lot of dogs, but some real gems too."

Steve
 

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qwerty said:
Yeah, Yeah, Yeah. This has been the case for years with Selmers, no? I bought my first Mark VI, a tenor, new over thirty years ago. And the word then was, " try a lot of 'em...there are a lot of dogs, but some real gems too."

Steve
Haha, and I think it will continue to be a problem as long as there are musical instruments.
 
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