Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 123 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I swear that my Rovner light is the brightest and most powerful ligature I have ever played on my HR Berg. I've compared it with the Francois Louis, Vandoren Optimum, Selmer, and many other high-end ligs. To me, metal ligs choke my sound off, whereas this Rovner light is really free blowing and warm. What are your thoughts?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
Joined
·
25,978 Posts
For me it depends upon the horn and mouthpiece, and of course which model of Rovner you're talking about. I like the basic model on soprano and can tolerate them on alto (favoring the Star Series/Evo-5). But for tenor, it's like wearing a raincoat on a sunny day at the beach.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
4,466 Posts
If it works for you then apparently not. Personally I think they're junk and THAT bad.
 

·
Undistinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
723 Posts
I've used Rovner Darks for a long time now, and now have a full set of them. I really liked them when they first came out, they seemed real hip, and Brecker was using them. Then I went through a phase of feeling that they choked off the sound, compared to a metal ligature.

Currently, I still use Rovners a lot of the time on my SAT horns. One thing I really like is the ease of use. I can put the reed on the mouthpiece and then put the mouthpiece on my sax, which is how I prefer to do it. And tuning the mouthpiece on the sax is easy to do, unlike some other ligs like the FL. One thing I seem to find is that after adjusting the mouthpiece to its final position, to loosen by the Rovner lig on the reed. This seems to free up the response of the reed, whereas a very tight ligature has the effect of damping or deadening the reed.

I think metal ligs still tend to have a bit more sizzle and brightness to the sound, but overall the Rovner works and is really user friendly. I do have a couple of Lights as well, and it is my impression that they are slightly brighter and more free than the traditional Darks, but not sure if this is just a feeling or an actual sound difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
I dig them. As long as the mouthpiece is in order I've nothing to complain about. IMO It's (almost) all about the shedding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
I swear that my Rovner light is the brightest and most powerful ligature I have ever played on my HR Berg. I've compared it with the Francois Louis, Vandoren Optimum, Selmer, and many other high-end ligs. To me, metal ligs choke my sound off, whereas this Rovner light is really free blowing and warm. What are your thoughts?
I think you should write ad copy for Rovner!

I really liked them when they first came out, they seemed real hip, and Brecker was using them.
You have photos of this? I've NEVER seen that. Did I miss something between 1975 and 2007?

Personally I think they're junk and THAT bad.
+1 - Big time!!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,384 Posts
POINT: Rovners are bad because they dampen and muffle the vibrations of the reed -- it's really just common sense if you think about it, since they're flexible and not hard. Because of this, they just kill the sound completely. This dampening effect actually creates an "Acoustic Kill Zone," a bubble spanning approximately 50 feet around your horn. People in the zone actually become physically ill; small animals kill themselves.

COUNTERPOINT: But my sound doesn't seem muffled at all; in fact, it seems to sound, you know, okay, loud, unmuffly, even good. And I haven't seen the kind of suffering you're describing take place in this "Acoustic Kill Zone" you're talking about.

POINT: The one place where they might help is if you have a crummy mouthpiece, either with a warped table or uneven facing -- the Rovner, with its soul-crushing dampening ability, can allow you to overcome the horrible mouthpiece, so that you can manage some sort of horrible sound on the thing.

COUNTERPOINT: Well, I've used it with good, reputable mouthpieces, I mean, even pieces by Doc Tenney and Jon Van Wie, and these were pieces that seal just fine with "regular" ligatures, so I don't think they had warped tables.

POINT: Shut up.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,936 Posts
I used to keep them in my gig bag just in case I crunched my preferred ligs and needed one. After 20+ years of never needing/using them, I finally gave them away. Somebody out there will use them.

I don't care for them on tenor hard rubber mouthpieces.

(Kelly: Counterpoint - Shut up).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
i love a muffled tone when getting a dark tone but when i want a clear tone i change ligature and mouthpiece. ligatures to me change the response and slightly muffles or clears depending on which way you look at it, the tone. My rovner dark is good, i like it. Nice end tone with that ligature, when it fits...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Keep in mind though guys that I'm an R&B player that likes a fairly bright sound.... I think traditional jazz players need a metal lig to compensate for a not-so-bright MP.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,444 Posts
I bought an EV0-5 to try out on my Otto Link STM and NY. It was cheap & I was curious. Plus, while the lig for the STM worked fine, the one for the NY did not. I actually experienced a louder, less muffled, noticeable difference on both pieces with the Rovner. It was almost as if more baffle had been installed. They are both late model Otto Links (both are less than 5 years old) so I know they have not been altered. I do know the reed seals against the table better using the EV0-5 rather than either of the original ligs. This lack of seal on the STM was less apparent and had less effect than on the NY. The response for both pieces was better using the EVO-5.

In the interest of full disclosure, the STM is a 6* and the NY is a 7.

I have a personal theory, through personal clinical observation (population of 1), that that position of the lips and "bite" of the embouchure on the reed itself and play as much a part in your sound as the lig. (That and I really don't want to shell out big bucks for the really cool ligs!) All I want a lig to do is hold the reed flat on the table. Then I can experiment with lig tightness and embouchure to get whatever sound and response is desired. But that's just me, others may be more, or, perish the thought (!), less discriminating than I. YMMV, of course.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
When the moon is in the seventh house - and Jupiter aligns with Mars . . . that's when I prefer my Rovners (light, medium, dark, EVO5, EDII). On Thursdays with an even number date I switch to my Selmers or Bonades or Vandoren Optimum and everything is right with the world. Oh, except when the particular reed I am using plays better with a Rovner than it does with a metal lig. I'm sorry I gave away my Winslows . . . I didn't know I had to use a not-so-bright mouthpiece for trad, though. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
it depends on the horn and what i want to sound like. i use the rovner light and prefer a darker sound, so i use it on the brigher horn. the true tone is very dark already, so metal lig for that.
i'm not keen on sounding bright as i was punished with violin lessons half my life.
if you don't want your rovner lig, send it to me :)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
·
4,881 Posts
I can't tell the sonic difference in ANY lig. What I do notice is how easy it is to use and how well it stays in alignment. I've got Rovners of all kinds, H ligs, Selmer two screws, Eddie Daniels, BG...can't really notice anything other than how they function

I was given a new Marc Jean (or is it Jean Marc?) that is supposed to be the new lig on the block. I haven't even tried it yet because I like (mechanically) what I am using. One of these days I will get around to trying it...we'll see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
I used to keep them in my gig bag just in case I crunched my preferred ligs and needed one.

For those who crunch their metal ligs Its always better to keep the metal ligs on the MP with an old reed to hold ligature shape and protect.
This way my set-up is consistent.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,444 Posts
I used to keep them in my gig bag just in case I crunched my preferred ligs and needed one.

For those who crunch their metal ligs Its always better to keep the metal ligs on the MP with an old reed to hold ligature shape and protect.
This way my set-up is consistent.
I have a late model Otto Link STM NY lig sitting around. I don't have a mouthpiece (mpc is currently using a different lig) to keep it on but I've found an old wine cork works great to protect it and hold it in shape!

Otherwise, I agree, I keep the ligs on the mpcs in their caps.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,853 Posts
I used to be a "ligs don't make any difference at all" kind of guy but lately, I've noticed that ligs don't make a drastic difference but they do in subtle ways. I do notice that my Rovner light is the lig that makes my Saxscape Fatcat play as it's supposed to play without my having to think about it more than any of my other ligatures. Plus, it stays on the mouthpiece. Others tend to want to slide off of the Saxscape because of the material the mouthpiece is made of (horrible stuff BTW) and the fact that the mouthpiece narrows towards the top end.

In other words........ no, Rovners are not that bad. I think your embouchure and air control can compensate for most ligature issues. I've had to use shoe laces as a clarinet ligature and by the end of the set, I forgot that I was using a shoe lace instead of a Vandoren Optimum.
 
1 - 20 of 123 Posts
Top