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Forum Contributor 2017
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Do players really stop playing their excellent high-end Taiwanese horns after a while and spend the price of a partial childrens college education?

Why don't more musicians play $10,000 Selmer Mark 6's? Are they just lazy and not working hard enough to afford one?

Are musicians less likely to make it if they continue to play these far east horns?

B :twisted:
 

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I doubt it but maybe some are. All of my five working saxes are Mark V1 but I didn't pay more than $2000 for any of 'em many years ago and I'm happy with them and I hate messing about and changing stuff. I'm not sure what " making it" is...making a living? I'm sure you can do that on any brand instruments if you're good enough.
 

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IMHO........cannonball saxes are quite good, and what I've heard from respected pros now on MAURIAT and ANTIGUA horns, same story. Have owned and played MK VI soprano, alto, tenor thru the years and now play cannonball on all three, although I still have my SBA tenor and an awesome 1929 SELMER BARI. Whether the new horns will stand the test of time remains to be seen, but as for playability they are everything my VI's were, and in some ways more. We all know there are great, good, fair, and not-so-good VI's, just like anything else. There are also great, good, fair, and not-so-good players..........the horns we play (and mouthpieces for that matter) have far less to do with where we fall in those categories than do the number of hours, days, weeks, months, and years we put into honing our craft. ___________________ (insert name of whomever you wish) will still sound like ____________________ no matter the horn/mouthpiece. Subtle differences yes, but still same player.
 

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Cute, but I've actually talked with way too many college students at seminars that were so pissed about throwing money away because the were talked into buying a so called "high-end Taiwanese horn" as a new and supposedly good sax to start college with only to find they did not hold up tone wise and mechanically to the Big 3 or 4 the college had.

But if you're happy with yours that's all that should matter to you, why are you worrying about others.
 

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I just did a quick search at WWBW - P Mauriat Tenors and Yamaha Professional Tenors aren't very far apart in price. To me the choice is crystalline. I like Taiwanese horns, but if I had to pay full retail there's no way I'd do it on a Taiwanese horn.
 

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Cute, but I've actually talked with way too many college students at seminars that were so pissed about throwing money away because the were talked into buying a so called "high-end Taiwanese horn" as a new and supposedly good sax to start college with only to find they did not hold up tone wise and mechanically to the Big 3 or 4 the college had.

But if you're happy with yours that's all that should matter to you, why are you worrying about others.
I've dealt with a ton of college students that are very happy Cannonball owners. None had issues with them at all. Now I own 3 myself.
 

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I've dealt with a ton of college students that are very happy Cannonball owners. None had issues with them at all. Now I own 3 myself.
I'm glad you like your horn, I did not name specific brands, I remember several of them but why list them, no need to egg on with any of it.

Just like that "other thread" both are for laughs and entertainment. This type of banter has no end or significance.
 

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Well, I was playing a P.Mauriat. But then I sold it to buy my Keilwerth SX90. To me, the two horns are completely different.
 

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Yep,

Almost all players that are "in the know" have moved to Bueschers, Conns, Kings or Martins. The Big Four rule!
 

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No Selmer, Yanagisawa, Keilwerth, or Yamaha tenor can do for me what my Barone Vintage does. I'll just leave it at that.
 

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my god, im getting so fed up with these kind of threads lately.
listen, if theres one thing SOTW has taught me, its that people all have different tastes.

let me tell you a quick story. when i began on saxophone, i asked my teacher what horn to get, and he told me he had a friend importing these tiwanese horns that were digital copys of a selmer series II. he did me the honour of playing his professional selmer seris III and this cheap tiwanese horn side by side for me, and i could easily hear that the tiwanese horn sounded better. mind you, his series III was filled with leaks, and was in desperate need of an overhaul.

i played that tiwanese horn for 2 years, and then my teacher offered to sell me his seris III alto because he was getting some cannonballs. naturally, i got the horn, mainly for bragging rights. and i've had that selmer for 2 years now.

the other day, i pulled my old tiwanese horn out of its box, and i was blown away at how much i preferred it to the selmer. the tone was just deeper and more flexible. now, im seriously considering overhauling my tiwanese horn and making that my main sax.

back in the day, selmer were considered the best saxophone makers, because they WERE!! there was nothing from conn, king, buescher etc that compared to the quality and sound of an SBA, or mark VI. if you could actually afford a real selmer though, i doubt you would have bought it and then gone looking for a new mouthpiece, or "revolutionary saxophone toy to improve your playing experience" no, you would have used whatever you had, and played your god dammned selmer till you were numb in the face.

thats the reason the greats played selmers. after years of playing their beloved horn, they became attached to it, and couldn't get used to a new sax.

let me finish with this. if your current horn plays well, and your mouthpiece gives you the sound you want, then get off SOTW right now, and just go play. play until your face falls off, and then play some more.

i know its an old cliche, but the horn doesn't make the player, the player makes the horn
 

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another quick story, this is about a good friend of mine james.

when james was in high school, all he wanted was to play tenor sax. but all he had was an alto. sitting in the corner of his music class was a yamaha yts21, very cheap student horn, but this horn looked like a steam roller had run over it. the neck was flat, the body was filled with dents, and missing most of its pads. the school said if his family made a donation to the schools building fund, he could have the saxophone. so 50 bucks, and a trip to our local woodwind tech later, he had his very own tenor. now, in the 25 or so years he's owned this horn, hes had the chance to play many, MANY professional horns. in fact, hes been able to play jerry bergonzi's, chris potters and joe lovanos horns all at gigs he's done with them. as well as this, he's spent countless days at robertos winds just trying high end horns. but every time he does, he finds that nothing is quite like his old yamaha.

this is a clip of him playing on good morning australia. now you tell me if you think brand name matters when you hear him play.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9t-m3_zU_s
 

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I like my Big Two -- Martin and Barone.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I like my Big Two -- Martin and Barone.
A man that walks on both sides of the fence at the same time is double down ahead!

Why limit yourself to this or that, play it all. Life is too short.

B
 

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I am by no means an expert and wouldn't classify myself as a professional musician. I played through college and then into graduate school and even had the chance to play some of the bigger venues in New Orleans while in grad school. I got a Mark VI alto while I was in high school, but here is the caviat. The guy who had the horn before me didn't take great care of it (I didn't know this at the time I bought it, but the first time I took it to the best sax tech around he gave me the history on the horn). He got it all tuned up to sell it and it played much better than my entry level horn which probably need an overhaul anyway. It played well right after it has been tweaked, but after a few months things started to come out of adjustment and I couldn't go longer than a year without taking it back in. I have since sold the horn, tired of the repeat business I was constantly creating and bought a newer horn which falls into the Taiwanese category and have been so much happier with it than I was with that particular VI. I can't comment on what I would have thought had I had a fabulous VI. Maybe I would still be playing it, but that horn wasn't giving me what I needed anymore and I was less worried about what was on the side of the case than they way the horn played when I went to replace it. People still learning the saxophone, for the most part, can't tell you the difference between horns, let alone what they like best about them. My feeling is they should get a horn that holds up well and is in their price range at the time. That way they won't be ticked when they spent "all this money" on a horn that they later on discover isn't their ideal. Once you have developed some mastery of the instrument then you can actually play test a few and find what fits you best. But your best fit won't be the best fit for everyone.
 
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