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Hello everyone,
I have read many mixed opinions about pad savers. I have used them in the past but I have been advise not to used them because they actually damage the pads in the long run.

I've tried to do a search but didn't find much.

I really appreciate your opinion.

Thanks and best,
 

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Whether long-term use of a Pad-Saver can damage pads is often alleged but never conclusively demonstrated; however, it's easy to avoid any risk entirely. Just don't store the Pad-Saver inside your horn. Use it as a stick swab, and then store it outside the sax as it dries. I get excellent results from Pad-Savers this way. They really are quick, convenient, effective body swabs.

I should add that I don't recommend the Neck Savers, i.e., a Pad-Saver-like swab for the sax neck. I don't find them effective. Use a pull-through swab for the neck.
 

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Been using them for decades now. Never have they damaged my horns.

Whether long-term use of a Pad-Saver can damage pads is often alleged but never conclusively demonstrated; however, it's easy to avoid any risk entirely. Just don't store the Pad-Saver inside your horn. Use it as a stick swab, and then store it outside the sax as it dries. I get excellent results from Pad-Savers this way. They really are quick, convenient, effective body swabs.

I should add that I don't recommend the Neck Savers, i.e., a Pad-Saver-like swab for the sax neck. I don't find them effective. Use a pull-through swab for the neck.
 

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Oddly it’s one of those items that doesn’t come with instructions. Left sitting inside the horn to get you home is fine but I don’t leave it in overnight. Fresh air is your friend. Take it out and let everything dry out. leave the sax on the stand overnight or at the very least in the case with the case open. I do the same for the neck. But I don’t use neck(?) saver. I’ve made a pull through cloth being careful not to get stuck on the pip. I have a similar set up that I made to draw through the horn prior to inserting the pad saver.
Wash the pad saver once in a while in warm soapy water by hand.
 

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I have been using pad savers for many years. I am sure one of the reasons why my last overhaul has been lasting over 6 years is because of the continuous use of a padsaver.
Mine is not even one of the expensive one. It came with a sax that I bought from a Chinese maker (It was the same model sold as Buffet 400) at the Frankfurt fair.

The fibers are synthetic but DON’T shed .

Using a padsaver does not too much when it comes to cleaning the horn in the bow so, every now and again you need to clean it with a pull-through


Now on a different issue.



There have to be several dozens of threads already open on this topic.

Opening a new thread has no other purpose than diluting information even further please, please check before , there is no shame in continuing an older thread.
Not only it will be included in the “ last active threads” but it wil also alert all the people which contributed before.

Keeping the archives costs money and space , not using them is a way to nullify all of this.

Use the search box in this pace in the middle at the top, where it says Google Custom Search (all the other boxes on the side of the pages don’t return anywhere near as many matches).

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?105171-Do-you-use-a-pad-saver-in-your-sax
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?46412-Pad-Savers-friend-or-foe
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?23754-Pad-Saver-Do-they-work
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?244938-Pad-Saver-for-Alto-helpful-or-harmful

And many more
 

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Anyone ever tried washing a pad saver?
 

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Been using them for years, never had any problems with the pads. I push them in and out a few times, drying them off after each time. Then I put them back in dry and leave them in the horn till next time I play. I do the same with the neck savers.
 

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Anyone ever tried washing a pad saver?
yes,m I have done this with several implements to clean saxophones, clarinets and things like that, no problem whatsoever
 

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Pull-throughs take only a few seconds to use and reach all the way every time. No inside-outside storage issue and no chance of them growing anything if you change the swab material every week or so. Using two for both body and neck, pulling each through just once, really dries the horn out well.

Keeping saxes out of their cases after playing is good advice, barring kids, pets and curious or clumsy guests.
 

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pull through have a very different function than padsavers
 

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Pad savers do next to nothing to dry out the pads. Left in the bore they only restrict air flow. If you get one for free there’s no harm in using it that I can see, but they are (IMO) nothing more than a clever way for music stores to increase their profits.

As someone else suggested, leave your instrument on a stand, or leave the case open and let the open air do the job. After a gig or rehearsal I bring my sax(s) inside and just open the case. Sometime the following day they get reassembled and put on a stand.

I tried using them for a while, but one day I mistakenly put the Alto pad saver in my tenor. It slipped into the bore and for a while I thought I’d never get it out....
 

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actually the moisture removed from a pull through is very little (observe the body after pulling through it will be still rather wet), but you remove particles which stick to the wet cloth.

The padsaver, due to to hair keeps on absorbing for quite some time. The bow is the only are where the pull though has a superiority , not so much with moisture as with any deposits collecting there.

As for so many things, mileage varies, this is my opinion based on my facts.
 

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Hmmm... why are my pull-throughs quite wet after passing through the horn, with the second one much drier than the first?

To each his own, I guess. Whatever works. The Cannonball I've owned and played most since 1998 never saw a padsaver yet it hasn't needed a single pad changed.
 

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and so does my horn, there many ways to skin a cat
 

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The HW Padsaver is the brand I use and recommend to my students and repair customers. In my view it is the other brands that have given padsavers a bad reputation for shedding and keeping moisture next to the pads. It seems the only folks who say they are bad for your saxophone or pads are those who have never actually used the HW Padsaver for any period of time. As a band director I required all of the saxophone players (except bari) to get one. At a minimum, it insured that the inside of the sax was "swabbed" at the end of each rehearsal. They are fast, easy and effective especially for younger students who don't have to hold a heavy saxophone up and turn it upside down to get the weight on the string of the swab to fall through.

I like to use the Chinese versions to spin with my electric drill covered with a paste made from Barkeeper's Friend inside saxophone bores to clean them as part of an overhaul. At least they are good for something. :)
 

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my padsaver has a very different fiber that the typical bicolor chinese one, I have fashioned two of those (one bent around the other) to clean the bells too , works fine.
 

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Opening a new thread has no other purpose than diluting information even further please, please check before
in general, i agree with this stance, however, since the forum admin won't correct the problems with the search function, it is sometimes easier / safer to start a new thread.

i usually swab my horn and then insert pad saver for storage. i don't know if it helps, but i don't think it hurts. i take padsaver in the shower every few months, or when i remember, and wash it out.
 

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I've used pad savers on my saxophone bores and necks for the past 25 years. My routine is to use a traditional silk pull through swab twice first through the bell and neck, then I left the fluffy pad savers in the neck and bore.

For baritone saxophone after "emptying" the spit valve , I use the hodge silk swab inserted into the bow twice (first one end and then the other) and remove it. It is quite wet on the first end. I then leave the hw fluffy pad saver in the bow.

I rarely need to have pads replaced. The techs who adjust the horns have commented on the good condition of the horns.

I don't like the idea of leaving a sax outside of the case for very long as I would fear it would be more easily damaged inadvertently.

I did have a problem with a pull through getting stuck in a straight one piece soprano and I ended up damaging the horn getting it out. That was the only adverse experience I've had with saxophone cleaning.
 

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I use pad/neck savers (neck, bore, bell, yes, there is an HW one specifically for the bell itself: https://hw-products-inc.myshopify.com/products/hw-pad-saver-r-for-alto-sax-bell). I always start by using a silk swab, but even after swabbing a lot of moisture is still left (if you stick your finger down the bore you'll be able to confirm this). I put the pad savers in and leave them in for about 30 minutes - 1 hour, then take them out. The neck and horn itself are pretty much dry at that point.

I usually leave the horn and neck out overnight, but if I put them in the case I make sure the pad savers are out.
 
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