Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey i was wondering if old bari's from the early to mid 1900's played good. Is it true that modern mouthpieces dont fit on the horns?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
I would tell you that any earlier than a 1931 can have intonation issues and won't have a front high F key. The first model that sounded like a selmer was known as the cigar cutter 1931-1934 seriel numbers 11951-11800, so anything with a serial number higher than 11951 are all very good saxophones with the Balanced and super balanced actions being the best.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Don't know about Bari's, but I owned a gold-plated model 22 alto...serial number in the low 2000's. It was an attractive horn, but not a great sounding horn...on the stuffy side. It came with the original mouthpiece, but my modern Selmer and Meyer mouthpieces fit it about the same way the original did.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
7,136 Posts
Also be aware that there are French made Selmers and USA Selmers. Many of the older ones on eBay are USA.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
I would tell you that any earlier than a 1931 can have intonation issues and won't have a front high F key. The first model that sounded like a selmer was known as the cigar cutter 1931-1934 seriel numbers 11951-11800, so anything with a serial number higher than 11951 are all very good saxophones with the Balanced and super balanced actions being the best.
Push that back a year - and modify the "cigar cutter" label, and I'll agree. My 12XXX alto was pre-cigar cutter (New Largebore), has front F, good intonation and sound and was built in 1930.

Essentially the transition seems to be between the Modele 28 and the Supersax range in its various incarnations, and the primary improvement the larger bore.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
So a selmer paris 16xxx? Is that serial any good?
I think that would be a "Super". The altos and tenors are good. Don't know about the baritones. I would be cautious of any pre-#20k Selmer baritone. Modern mouthpieces will fit on any vintage saxophone. Intonation problems may occur with high-baffle pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I think that would be a "Super". The altos and tenors are good. Don't know about the baritones. I would be cautious of any pre-#20k Selmer baritone. Modern mouthpieces will fit on any vintage saxophone. Intonation problems may occur with high-baffle pieces.
High baffle? Would a selmer C## be considered high baffle? Thats the mouthpiece i would use on it.

Its weird how i also learned that balanced action saxophones were made during world war 2 when france was under german rule. Wonder how those saxes sound?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
High baffle? Would a selmer C## be considered high baffle? Thats the mouthpiece i would use on it.
High-baffle mouthpieces are usually medium chamber, long shank mouthpieces with a sharp drop or bullet shaped drop between the tip and chamber. Many Berg Larsen, Dukoff, Guardala or Brilhart "level-air" pieces would fall into this group. Some Otto Links or other vintage pieces have been modified with a "wedge"-type custom baffle. The baffle works like an air foil on a plane where the air speeds up as it passes over the curved surface. On the saxophone, this makes the air velocity faster than the players own air-stream. Therefore, high-baffle mouthpieces are easy to play at loud volume. A side-effect is a brighter and edgier tone and a sharper upper register. The player can compensate for this. Some players with a darker and more traditional tone have played these types of pieces like Coleman Hawkins, Plas Johnson, Yusef Lateef and Wardell Gray who all played metal Bergs at one time or another.

The compromise is the "roll over baffle" seen in pieces like Guy Hawkins, Wolfe Tayne, Lawton and some Guardala models. These tend to play like older metal Links but with a bit more power.

On the baritone, Berg Larson and Lawton mouthpieces have become pretty standard for jazz players who need volume and power but don't want to sound like a chainsaw.

A Selmer Paris C** is not a high-baffle or roll-over baffle piece. There are different models of Selmer mouthpieces but most have a medium chamber with straight walls in the "reed window" area. The Larry Teal or "LT" Selmers have a round chamber.

In general, a Selmer mouthpiece on baritone is not good for getting a big, fat, rich jazz sound or a buzzy, powerful funk sound. Better keep it for classical sax quartet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the info BarrySachs. So how would an Otto Link sound on the bari? Between a 5 and an 8 which mouthpiece should i get?

Edit: I would also like to know why the altos and tenors super selmers cost more than the bari's. thnks
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top