Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, in searching for a new way to help my students double time during solos I decided to give Steve Neff's "Approach Note Velocity" book a go.

The youtube clips of his approach reminded me of the lines I often play in the few keys I am very comfortable in. Got the book and realized that I would benefit greatly by working on this myself. Right off the bat it got me playing some appraches and lines I wouldn't normally reach for. And best of all it got me playing in all the keys. I discovered that the sole reason I was comfortable in certain keys is because I already had a vocabulary of approaches. The book leveled the playing field in my uncomfortable keys by providing new vocabulary.

Another killer thing that I have been doing is taking his smaller approach cells and rhythmically displacing them. To aebersold, I'll take Neff's 1st approach and improvise playing all of them on one, then another round on the and of 1, then another round of 2, then beginning the and of 2, etc... This is opening up my awareness of where I am in the bar. Forcing resolutions in locations I never would have otherwise. Cool stuff...

These approaches are also polishing my altissimo register as the cells are very easy to hear and make a nice platform to play them up in that register with a quality tone and intonation.

Get this book... It's great stuff.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Sure Steve. I am very excited about this book. I have all of Bergonzi's and really enjoyed digesting those...but I wish I would have stumbled across this one first. Not because it's more basic or easy but because these approaches are further reaching than say just pentatonics or hextonics, etc...

I think another cool approach to your book would be to combine it with Garzone's triadic thing. I love that open modern sound of triads but it can start to sound stale. It would be really cool to take his random triads and connect them with your approaches. Anyway...looking forward to a lengthy amount of time digesting and experiementing with your book.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,786 Posts
Sure Steve. I am very excited about this book. I have all of Bergonzi's and really enjoyed digesting those...but I wish I would have stumbled across this one first. Not because it's more basic or easy but because these approaches are further reaching than say just pentatonics or hextonics, etc...

I think another cool approach to your book would be to combine it with Garzone's triadic thing. I love that open modern sound of triads but it can start to sound stale. It would be really cool to take his random triads and connect them with your approaches. Anyway...looking forward to a lengthy amount of time digesting and experiementing with your book.
I actually do have a number of lessons on my site on connecting triad pairs by chromatic approaches. It's a very cool concept and makes the triad pair concept not seem as mundane.
 

·
Distinguished Member, Forum Contributor 2012-2015
Joined
·
5,878 Posts
Excellent books (major and minor), I highly recommend them too.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top