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Discussion Starter #1
I’m considering a tenor that has a vintage patina applied with engraving through the patina. For those that own or have worked on one with a few years’ mileage is the patina effectively going to function as an antitarnish, or at least slow the tarnish process down?

To keep the contrast between the engraving visually sharp is Renaissance Wax the preferred “preservative”? I use it on my bare brass Zephyr for he bell and neck, but I have no experience with this type of finish. So, ask and learn :)
 

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any patination involves only a superficial layer and will wear out in the contact points wax will provide some protection from oxidation but will not prevent abrasion because it will be abraded itself.
 

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Depends on the patina formula and method applied. Is this a factory patina formula ? or just some hardware-store bought thing ?
Was it just applied cold to bare brass ? Was it applied hot to the brass ? (meaning, in the process is the metal actually heated).

If you have no clue and cannot find out, you can always test an area with the Renaissance and see how that goes.
 

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the horns that I sold “ made in Taiwan" from a local company had several types of factory applied patina and I used one for while and the patina rubbed off.
 

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let's see saving the Faux Vintage appearance from turning into a "real" vintage patina which is indeed basically tarnish ??????????? ***


lord help us
 

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let's see saving the Faux Vintage appearance from turning into a "real" vintage patina which is indeed basically tarnish ??????????? ***


lord help us
LOL. My thoughts exactly!
 

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You have an unlacquered horn. The patina, whether chemically achieved or gained over time, will wipe off. It will be uneven, the color will change slightly over time depending upon your environment and relative humidity. You can wax on wax off, but whatever you rub is going to polish clean.
 

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Not necessarily so - the horn very well may be lacqured over the 'patina' application with engraving through the lacquer in the traditional manner. Assuming this is correct for the OP horn, you maintain the contrast of the clean raw brass of the engraving by simply cleaning the engraving area with an acid that removes tarnish (oxidation) but doesn't affect lacquer. A grocery store/hardware store product called 'CLR' (calcium, lime, rust) is great for this purpose and comes in an inexpensive pump spray. You can try it with a Q-Tip in a concealed place to see if it wipes off the 'patina' which would prove it is not lacquered. Selmer and all others use any of various chemicals to put a dark oxidation on the new sax, then they remove it on the high/exposed parts by 'carding' (rubbing with something - could be a wire brush, steel wool or 'ScotchBrite' pad) then they shoot it with a clear coat. It could also be an unlacquered sax that had a 'patina' applied with no lacquer over it. In this case the 'patina' would be extremely fragile and would basically wipe right off.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don’t have the horn yet, but asking questions before a potential purchase is a way to be more informed of what to expect,
 

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All I know is that the vintage finish Selmer used on the reference horns turns black after time.
Perhaps it contains some silver chloride or silver nitrate. AFAIK both of those turn grey then black on exposure to light, hence their use in photographic film.
 
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