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Antigua made a MKVI look-a-like in their earlier days . . . some were marked ANTIGUA, others weren't. Mine is somewhat like the one you linked but there are differences, which I suppose could be attributed to what an importer could order. The similarities are that with the exception of the brand marked on them (mine is marked KUSTOM) and a serial number, there appears to be no country-of-origin on either of them. Most MKVI-clones are more completely marked, in my experience. DAVE
 

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Dave...was your pinky table anything like the one on this horn ?

I am particularly intrigued by the 'step' in the body tube near the top (diameter is decreased at a particular point so interior/exterior tapered surface is no longer one continuous plane), this was a spec done to correct inherent intonation problems in the upper registers with a straight. I know Yani did this (I also know this ain't no Yani).

But is that detail common on inexpensive asian horns these days ?
 

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Jaye: Yes, the pinky table on my KUSTOM (which I THINK was made by Antigua) is similar to the one linked in your OP. The KUSTOM also has that pronounced step-down on the neck.

I have two MKVI sopranos (1959 and 1972) and I also compared them to my KUSTOM. The 1959 has an obvious expansion at that point on its neck, but it is a smooth transition . . . the 1972 has the same look on the neck as the KUSTOM (a definite expansion) and the neck on the one linked in your OP.

However, the shape of the upper octave pad-cup and connection is a bit different on my KUSTOM.

All of the pinky tables are similar, although there are some minor differences, they have basically the same lay-out.

My 1959 MKVI does not have hi-F# keying, but the KUSTOM and the 1972 MKVI do have hi-F# keying.

There way more similarities than there are differences among the four sopranos we are discussing.

I came to the Antigua conclusion because of comments I received from Kessler and Hales. Plus, I saw an eBay auction a while back showing an Antigua that looked just like my KUSTOM. I don't know of many manufacturers who made MKVI look-alikes except for Yanagisawa (the S6 and all of the stencils they made, which I think were all labelled as having been made in Japan) and earlier Buffets which were labelled as such.

Oh, I could be way off base, too. DAVE
 

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I have a cheapo EM Winston that looks just like this. It is room decor. I am 95% sure it was made the same place this one was made.
 

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Saxcop: Interesting. I suspect that whoever made the horn (mine included) made it circa 1980s when makers like Yanagisawa and Antigua were still into the MK6 style. I could be off a few years, but after the modern design took hold, I’m guessing most Asian makers switched over and the MK6 look was done.

Of course, there was the Chinese who made the KennyG soprano which was mostly a MK6 look. Just speculation, though. DAVE
 

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Very interesting, both of you. So looks like c. mid-eighties or newer asian....there are actually TWO of these on eFlay right now, engraved with different names...
 

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Yes, I agree, mid eighties Chinese or Taiwanese (before several companies on Taiwan started the production of better and bette know horns) instrument.

The portion which we could call the “ neck” bears a very visible portion soldered on to the rest of the body, this is not really strange. Even the YSS 475 1 shoes traces of a “ bump” in the body there (the early Weltklangs look IN THAT AREA ALONE so I am not suggesting this is a Weltklang , like this horn). see here (https://static.wixstatic.com/media/..._2.jpg/v1/fill/w_498,h_664,al_c,q_90/file.jpg )

Then there is this “ Mark VI” Look alike mechanics.





All in all very similar to Gulf, Lark, Parrot, sopranos

things like these (see the same bump , left hand plateau and left hand palm keys).

 

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I don't know if it matters, but on my KUSTOM, the left pinky table has just two black rollers . . . the roller on low C# is a long, black, one-piece roller that runs the whole length of the touch. This is different from what milandro posted as well as my MKVI's . . . they all have two short rollers (two separate rollers) on the low C# touch.

About that change in outside diameter at the top of the neck. I'm not so sure the one's I have are welded there. The size-transition is very smooth. On my '59 MKVI, the sudden increase in the tube's diameter is very smooth yet visible to the eye and to the touch. The '72 MKVI and the KUSTOM have a more radical increase and the step-up is more prominent, yet the horns' finish does not suggest a two-piece weld but rather a one-piece tube which was formed that way.

At a quick glance, all of the sopranos being discussed here are MKVI designs - the pattern Selmer used on their sopranos including those preceding the MKVI . . . the "in-line" left palm keys, the three low bell pads on top of the tube, the step-up in the tube's diameter near the neck, etc.

The differences come in the smaller details of the keywork . . . the shape of the touches on the left pinky table, and the shape of the hi-F# touch, for instance. I'm guessing that most makers of stencils use basically the same keywork to assemble their instruments. So if Antigua made my KUSTOM (and maybe the one shown in the OP), we could expect that the small details in the keywork would be the same among these sopranos as they are on labelled Antiguas.

My problem with it all is that I've never seen an older Antigua soprano the looked like a MKVI, only an eBay photo from years ago - and that horn was black in color, as I recall.

For what its worth, my KUSTOM is very nice. The finish is almost pristine, the horn plays well but feels a bit heavier than my MKVIs. Oh well . . . DAVE
 

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I am particularly intrigued by the 'step' in the body tube near the top (diameter is decreased at a particular point so interior/exterior tapered surface is no longer one continuous plane), this was a spec done to correct inherent intonation problems in the upper registers with a straight. I know Yani did this (I also know this ain't no Yani).

But is that detail common on inexpensive asian horns these days ?
For Taiwan saxes, I've only seen the bump on the one piece Jupiter 547 or 747.

I found this interesting example on a Dolnet currently listed on the bay.
 

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Horns like this popup in the second hand market in China quite frequently. Most don't have any identifying marks, such as builder or even country of origin. I have seen some marked "Japan" or "Taiwan", but hard to say if they are legitimate.

I am particularly intrigued by the 'step' in the body tube near the top (diameter is decreased at a particular point so interior/exterior tapered surface is no longer one continuous plane), this was a spec done to correct inherent intonation problems in the upper registers with a straight. I know Yani did this (I also know this ain't no Yani).
But is that detail common on inexpensive asian horns these days ?
I have one "Kenny G" design Chinese made soprano that has the step at the neck.

My other Asian made Mark VI style horn is a TK Melody Legend. It has very smooth transition on the neck like Dave Dolson describes on his '59; present but it doesn't show up in a photo. Not exactly an inexpensive horn, though.
 
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