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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else used a mouthpiece that is usually classified as a "classical" mouthpiece for jazz?

I find that my hard rubber Rousseau Classic mouthpieces work really well for jazz work, especially on my bari with a jazz reed (LaVoz).

Thank you for your replies.
 

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Back in high School before i could afford something else, I used my C* for jazz band.

Ive also dont the opposite, and Used my Berg on bari sax for a classical situation
 

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I've often used my C* for 'jazz' in concert band situations. I did the 'Harlem Nocturne' with the Hawaii County Band on a S80 C*.

Note: as a conductor, I would put a bari played with a berg in concert band in between the banjo and accordian section;):D
 

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C*

I played a sekmer C* for several years until my music teacher said he would trade me for his Meyer5...I have kept the meyer every since, but IMO jazz is more technique and knowhow than anything else....The mouthpiece should be the last territory to conquer, unless a mouthpiece just gives you problems such as shutting down or something. So yes I bet many people have used C*s and the like for jazz.
 

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used an S90-190 (Selmer classical!) piece on alto with good results (enough power, good blending) when I was playing alto 2 in college big band, with a Vandoren Java reed (before I got a Meyer 5 replica).

However, playing on a C* on bari didn't give me enough punch over the brass section. I switched to a Rico B chamber with good results, then to a Berg clone.
 

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See my signature for my set ups. Each one is along classical lines. I use them for all of my playing -- big band, small group jazz, etc....

Roger
 

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listen to Joe Hederson. He plays a "classical" style selmer mouthpiece. Though, it is opened up.

-Zach
 

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I have just switched from a Meyer 6M to a Selmer S80 C* because I was getting to much "wind and rain" through the meyer (too open for me?)

My teacher suggested I blow through his C* and it made a huge difference.

My core tone is still the same, I just get a purer note, a bit "buzzier" and "fuzzier" which is nice. With me the Meyer sounded very woody and breathy

Here are some examples PLEASE don't listen to the standard of playing, because I am still learning but you may hear a slight tone difference,

here is the Selmer S80 c*


and the Meyer 6M


Is one more "Jazz" than the other??
 

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crazydaisydoo said:
here is the Selmer S80 c*


and the Meyer 6M


Is one more "Jazz" than the other??
You Bet! The Selmer is great and you sound terrific for having been playing for such a short time! Respect:cool: ! I know of many more people, including myself, having being playing for much longer and not being able to play that well.

Amazing, when I had S80 for my tenor it played (I sounded really terrible with it, my tenor sounded like a cello), I've tried the Meyer on a alto, sounds stuffy, your sound is ok, but you sound better on the Selmer.
 

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milandro said:
Amazing, when I had S80 for my tenor it played (I sounded really terrible with it, my tenor sounded like a cello),
Actually, that's the idea...sound like a cello.

I think you probably sound better on the C* due to the smaller tip. If you haven't been playing for a while, try the Meyer again in a year or two, and see what you think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Crazydaisydoo.....love your playing.

Would it be too much trouble to record the tune you played with the Meyer again but on the C* this time? It would be good to hear the difference on the same tune.

The opinion my wife gave (which is always what we should listen to, isn't it fellas!?!) is that each mouthpiece sounded right for the style of music being played. Very interesting....and I tend to agree.

Thanks, again!
 

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I enjoyed both tunes! I think the whole "jazz mpc vs classical mpc" thing is a bunch of hoooey myself. So, to answer your question no you didn't sound any jazzier on the meyer to me!:)
 

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Crazydaisy -- Interesting about the Meyer and the Selmer C*. I started with a Selmer 80 C* and my sax teacher sold me his Meyer 6M to get a better sound. I do prefer the sound on the Meyer, but it takes so much more air that I'm able to sustain long tones with it that are literally only half as long as with my C*.

At this point -- playing only 3 months -- I know it doesn't make much sense for me to use the Meyer just for a sound I prefer, but it's all about having fun.

I may now try the C* again with a harder reed. With the soft reed it was too buzzy for me, but I think my emboucher is strengthened from when I last tried it with a harder reed, and I do remember getting a better sound with a harder reed. In any case, your recordings are good proof that jazz is more about how you play and not what you play it with. Actually, though, I wonder whether the Meyer isn't quite a bit better at letting me play louder and with a much nicer bite than I could get out of the C*. Again, maybe it's a difference that could be minimized with a different reed, but I think your relatively soft style of playing isn't really one that's likely to reveal whether Meyer might be better for Jazz, even if it is.

Regarding your ongoing tribulations with Confirmation, I'd say, "Keep it up!". As with a lot of your other stuff, my only bit of constructive criticism is that your playing is quite soft and fluffy, lacking the crispness and precision of, e.g., the Confirmation recording on Youtube by Cheeseman (I notice you like the Cheeseman too). Seems to me that your soft flowing streams of notes are to a certain extent a positive thing, kind of a trademark, but I'd still like to hear the notes with each having just a little more definition. Your solo is certainly more flowing than Cheeseman's. In comparison his is herky jerky. I don't know Confirmation very well so I don't know whether he was actually staying close to the transcription, but to me it seemed like he would almost stop because things got sort of out and control, and gather himself again to get back on track.
 

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I actually prefer the Meyer Sound. But it would be an easier comparison if you played the same tune.

Here's a couple thoughts:

1) Try a slighly softer reed on the Meyer.
2) Try a Selmer Super Session Alto Mouthpiece
3) Try an S-80 in C** or D facing

I played tenor on a Metal C* and was good enough to make All-State Jazz back when I was a kid. I didn't know any better and developed my Jazz sound around a "classical" mouthpiece. I still play relatively close mouthpieces. It's just more comfortable. Good Luck
 

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Let me revive this thread ( Hey Hey my my, archived threads will never die...)

My mouthpiece of choice ( Brancher J27) had to undergo a small repair but because of this I was compelled to use something different while it was away for its journey, back to the factory.

So I was trying some of the mouthpieces that I have in my possession and got a tenor S80 C* , probably after the Yamaha 4C the most standard mouthpiece on the planet. It wouldn’t work with several reeds (too soft for it) but I got to my collection of synthetics and I started playing.

Best results were obtained with a Fibracell ( must be a rather soft one anyway but the sticker has faded away over the years)

I had to get used to the mouthpiece feeling much larger than the metal tenor ( gave me some jaw problems at first) that I have but , after a while, I really found the sound to be very jazzy and even on the bright side if you don’t go for the subtoning.

Well, I had to think again of the : “ Definition of a Jazz mouthpiece” given to me ages ago by a fellow member: " a jazz mouthpiece is any mouthpiece that you play jazz with!"
 

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well, both Soloist en Selmer Metal Soprano have a well documented use among jazz players ( Joe Henderson is probably one of the most famous Selmer Soloist players) but the humble S80 generally considered the standard ebonite mouthpiece for classical players and provided with most saxophones, is not often credited wit Jazz credentials, that’s why I was so suprised.
 

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I don’t know what you think about Paquito but he played on a metal selmer piece. There was a time here when all of the guys in chicago were playing on bigger selmer rubber pieces. Nice dark, big sound. A good sound is a good sound. It translates. I know luloff (classical) was playing on a piece that was open and many used for jazz, I vaguely remember it was a Morgan or something. At any rate it wasn’t a traditional selmer classical piece.


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